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Garden Plant ID's. Post here!

zozo

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I bought some hemp agrimony seeds

I guess that's correct, it's an Agrimonia sp. :)

The other one looks like a young Peper plant.

Ah!? cross-posted with Darrel, didn't know there was a different Hemp agrimony...
 

mort

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Thanks Darrel, I thought capsicum but no idea where they came from as I haven't grown any peppers or chillies this year.

Not considered herb agrimony because I thought I already had it. A friend told me the below plant was herb agrimony when we were on a dog walk so I collected a few seeds. So guess I have another Id for you:D
The leaves last winter and early spring were really tough, spikey and almost thistle like but they seem to have softened now the flower spikes have shot up. Not the greatest pics because it's really windy


20200620_115021.jpg
20200620_115050.jpg
20200620_115057.jpg


Thanks
 

mort

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didn't know there was a different Hemp agrimony...

It makes a great pond plant which is why I ordered the seeds in the first place (which definitely say hemp agrimony on them).
 

dw1305

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H all,
So guess I have another Id for you
That one is Weld or Dyer's Rocket (Reseda luteola). It is a biennial, but will seed into gravel paths etc. It likes bare limy ground, so you get it wild on the downs etc., but away from that it is nearly always a "weed" of limestone gravel, so along railway lines, on car parks etc.
It makes a great pond plant
Yes, Hemp Agrimony likes wet, or bare ground, it is a very good grower, so you may need to weed a bit out every year.

<"Fleabane"> (Pulicaria dysenterica) and <"Valerian"> (Valeriana officinalis) are other attractive wild, pond marginal plants that are likely to abuse your hospitality. All the plants mentioned in this part of the thread are attractive to pollinating insects.

cheers Darrel
 

mort

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Interesting you mention valeriana, I've got a couple of dozen I grew from seed. Didn't realise it was as potentially rampant as that. I plan to put a load around the pond and spread some through the borders.
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
Didn't realise it was as potentially rampant as that.
It is the most incredible self seeder, you can see it in the background of the pond photo, but it enjoyed itself in the gravel garden and borders as well. I've probably pulled out fifty seedlings this year and it also spreads by runners.

front_gardenjune2018-jpg-jpg.jpg


cheers Darrel
 

mort

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I've only grown it once, about 5 years ago, and had one plant in my front garden that did fine for the first year but then completely disappeared. So for me it wasn't that prolific:D I do have a couple of white umbellifers that popped up this year that I think are probably them but I never really thought about it until now.

I don't mind stuff that self seeds a plenty, I'd like to get to the stage where I don't need to do anything apart from some light editing.
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
I do have a couple of white umbellifers that popped up this year that I think are probably them but I never really thought about it until now.
It does look like an umbellifer, but very slightly pinky and little tubular flowers when you look closely. It might be a humidity issue, it is really common in W. Ireland and grows in a lot of the fields. Locally I've only ever seen it in wet places.
I don't mind stuff that self seeds a plenty, I'd like to get to the stage where I don't need to do anything apart from some light editing.
I'm a great fan of the self seeders as well, I like "light editing" as a concept.

cheers Darrel
 

mort

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I'm not sure what these are and if they are even the same species.

20200621_120251.jpg


This is smaller than the other but grown in the shade of a hedge.

20200621_120312.jpg


This is two plants grown together that have their roots in water and have got very leggy. They have suffered from the strong winds so are flopped over. Not sure if it's possible to Id from the terrible pictures but I'd guess they appeared from a moved pond plant rather than from my valerian, which makes me suspect a different species. Maybe Pimpinella major?
 

mort

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Took the dog for a swim last night and now I know what I'm looking for, saw valerian everywhere in the ditches. The meadowsweet is really abundant this year as well as norfolk hawkers which were hunting everywhere (including me when one flew straight into me but was luckily alright). We even saw a couple of cetti warblers much to the annoyance of the twitches that had been there since 8 am and not seen any:D
 

zozo

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Anybody an idea what this sneaking might be? It has a wooden stem and it seems to be some kinda climbing shrub...
12.04.17.jpeg


I have a plant ID app on the phone, but it only suggests herb-like plants that do not have a wooden stem.

:)
 

jamila169

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Anybody an idea what this sneaking might be? It has a wooden stem and it seems to be some kinda climbing shrub...
View attachment 167936

I have a plant ID app on the phone, but it only suggests herb-like plants that do not have a wooden stem.

:)
if those leaves are paired , I'm convinced it's some sort of Fuchsia, looks like the top has been killed by frost or knocked off, hence the side shoots
 

zozo

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if those leaves are paired , I'm convinced it's some sort of Fuchsia, looks like the top has been killed by frost or knocked off, hence the side shoots

Thank you...

It could be, if it's Fuchsia I guess I have to wait till late summer before it flowers. :) I first noticed it in this pot last summer as a tiny plantlet and let it be found interesting enough to find out what it is. It had about 1 week -12°C last winter but it doesn't look damaged in any way. The very top shows a tiny green sprout... And it seems to be a relatively fast grower. It's 4 x the size compared to last year.

What do you exactly mean by the term paired leaves? I know about alternate and opposite. And the internodes, as well as the leaves, are Alternate. :)

That naked stem next to it is not from the same plant, that's a Walnut.
 

jamila169

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leaves on Fuchsia are either arranged in opposite pairs or opposite trios depending on the cultivar -if it is one it's probably one of the more hardy but fancy ones, they're surprisingly robust and will put up with a lot, all you can do it wait to see if it does anything (might not be one, but that's where my brain went when I saw the growth type and habit)
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
Anybody an idea what this sneaking might be?
Willow (Salix sp.)? The photo is slightly out of focus.
leaves on Fuchsia are either arranged in opposite pairs or opposite trios depending on the cultivar
They are, but that definitely has alternate shoots (and buds), so I'm pretty sure it isn't a Fuchsia.
That naked stem next to it is not from the same plant, that's a Walnut.
I was wondering about that one.

cheers Darrel
 

mort

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I've got a willow cutting that looks identical to that. If it stops raining I'll try and remember to pop up a picture so you can compare. I don't know the exact species I have but think it might be flanders red.
It's the leaves that cause the confusion I think as it doesn't look like a normal willow at this time.
 

zozo

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Willow (Salix sp.)? The photo is slightly out of focus.
I never would have thought of that But looking up some pictures I can see some resemblance, a young weeping willow maybe? ... :) I'll see I get a better picture tomorrow.

I was wondering about that one.
I'm still in doubt if it survived that severe sudden winter shock last winter in this pot, it's 1 or 2 years old maybe. The stem still looks sappy, but yet didn't see new leave growth. I think this is a tad too late? I don't really know when it first sprouted, i regularly find wall-nuts in my garden under the chestnut tree. I guess squirrels or maybe birds like crows have dropped them.

:) I live in a rather birth rich area, and always find strange sneak-in plants, shrubs and trees that I did not plant myself. Also found a nice baby Crataegus sp. and an Ilex sp. under the cherry tree this spring.
 

zozo

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@dw1305 I'm about convinced you are most likely correct and I think it's a Salix caprea (Goat Willow)? :) What still throws me off a little bit is, it did not lose its leaves last winter it stayed green. And Salix doesn't seem to be an evergreen. Or is it in soft winters?

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I found several examples looking very similar also with the reddish hue in the young leaves...

Reading about cultivation it seems they are extremely difficult to grow from seed... And here it is spontaneously in an old pot in the garden.
 

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