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The Soil Substrate or Dirted Planted Tank - A How to Guide

Discussion in 'Tutorials' started by Tim Harrison, 9 Dec 2011.

  1. willsy

    willsy Newly Registered

    Messages:
    14
    Hi Tim,

    I'm in the process of changing my substrate to Seachem black sand (from Seachem flourite) and wanted to create a hill as you did in your example.

    Can I ask if it's a bag of gravel that you used for that? Can I also ask what the bag is made of? Is it some sort of stocking?

    Thanks and regards

    Will
     
  2. Tim Harrison

    Tim Harrison Forum Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    3,782
    willsy and dw1305 like this.
  3. willsy

    willsy Newly Registered

    Messages:
    14
    Thanks very much Tim, that's perfect.

    Also, thanks so much for your guide... I setup a tank a few years ago following your guide and had fantastic success...

    I'm currently in the process of carrying out a full re-scape and I'm back here for your guide again! :)

    Will.
     
    Tim Harrison likes this.
  4. willsy

    willsy Newly Registered

    Messages:
    14
    One more question if you don't mind Tim...

    As I'm replacing substrate etc in a fully cycled tank running with a canister filter, I was going to put the fish and shrimps in a plastic box while I did this and then put them back into the tank on the same day.

    I notice in your guide you refer to the fact that the soil will give out ammonia for a week or two afterwards though.

    Do you think I would therefore need to move my fish etc to another temporary home with a running filter for a week or two whilst the tank soil settles down?

    Thanks very much.

    Will.
     
  5. Tim Harrison

    Tim Harrison Forum Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    3,782
    I think it'd be wise to keep them in a temporary home until nitrite and ammonia levels are as near as damn it zero. It's one of the only times I advocate using a test kit.
    If your filter is cycled it shouldn't take too long, and you may not even experience much of an ammonia spike at all...but best to be safe than sorry.
    Daily water changes will help as well.
    Back in the day I used to put critters back in the tank same day without ill effect...but I wouldn't recommend it now.

    P.S. I should add my tanks were always heavily planted from the outset.
     
    Last edited: 1 Jan 2017
    willsy, zozo and PARAGUAY like this.
  6. willsy

    willsy Newly Registered

    Messages:
    14
    Thanks... I've invested in a temporary plastic tank.

    Should prove useful in the future for various things too!
     

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