Pruning - A general guide to plant maintenance

Discussion in 'Tutorials' started by James Flexton, 4 Sep 2007.

  1. cdwill

    cdwill Newly Registered

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    I've read that some leave damaged or dying leaves on the plant until they rot away, while others prune these same leaves. The rationale for leaving them on is apparently that they'll continue to absorb some (albeit less) nutrients and provide energy, while the rationale for pruning is to prevent algae from growing and to eliminate the plant's focus of energy toward damaged/dying leaves in favor of healthy and/or new leaves. Which approach is correct?
     
  2. PARAGUAY

    PARAGUAY Member

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    This theory is a bit of a new one on me l aways assumed old plant leaves are best removed and the plant will be better for that ,as it energises the plant in new growth, maybe you have read this somewhere as part of a wider context?Maybe one of the plants expert will come in on this
     
  3. Glenda Steel

    Glenda Steel Member

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    I can't thank you enough for posting this James, just at a time when I needed it most!!!!!
     
  4. Tim Harrison

    Tim Harrison Global Moderator Staff Member

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    I wouldn't ever leave leaves to rot away, for various reasons, not least because it increases organics, encourages algae, and is aesthetically unpleasant.

    Generally speaking I remove damaged and dying leaves as soon as I notice them if I think the plant can withstand the loss; that can depend on how many leaves the plant has, how vigorous it's growth and the species, and the growing environment.

    For instance, it's perhaps a good idea to leave some damaged leaves, or those with some algae if the plant is trying to establish itself.
    Once established and new growth starts to come through then it maybe a good time to trim old and damaged growth.
     
    Last edited: 9 Jun 2016
    Glenda Steel likes this.
  5. Gerryf77

    Gerryf77 Newly Registered

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    Great article
     
  6. DjDamo

    DjDamo Newly Registered

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    Good article
     
  7. Marco Teodonio

    Marco Teodonio Newly Registered

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    Well written!
    Useful!

    Marco
     
  8. HafMan

    HafMan Member

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    Thanks for putting this together. It’s been a great help!
     
  9. Costa

    Costa Member

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    Although I never got to the point of pruning as my plants usually don't get to grow that much, this is very useful and thank you for putting together
     

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