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Pruning - A general guide to plant maintenance

cdwill

Seedling
Joined
30 May 2016
Messages
5
Location
New Jersey, US
I've read that some leave damaged or dying leaves on the plant until they rot away, while others prune these same leaves. The rationale for leaving them on is apparently that they'll continue to absorb some (albeit less) nutrients and provide energy, while the rationale for pruning is to prevent algae from growing and to eliminate the plant's focus of energy toward damaged/dying leaves in favor of healthy and/or new leaves. Which approach is correct?
 

PARAGUAY

Member
Joined
13 Nov 2013
Messages
2,257
Location
Lancashire
This theory is a bit of a new one on me l aways assumed old plant leaves are best removed and the plant will be better for that ,as it energises the plant in new growth, maybe you have read this somewhere as part of a wider context?Maybe one of the plants expert will come in on this
 

Tim Harrison

Administrator
UKAPS Team
Joined
5 Nov 2011
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8,639
Location
UK
I've read that some leave damaged or dying leaves on the plant until they rot away, while others prune these same leaves. The rationale for leaving them on is apparently that they'll continue to absorb some (albeit less) nutrients and provide energy, while the rationale for pruning is to prevent algae from growing and to eliminate the plant's focus of energy toward damaged/dying leaves in favor of healthy and/or new leaves. Which approach is correct?
I wouldn't ever leave leaves to rot away, for various reasons, not least because it increases organics, encourages algae, and is aesthetically unpleasant.

Generally speaking I remove damaged and dying leaves as soon as I notice them if I think the plant can withstand the loss; that can depend on how many leaves the plant has, how vigorous it's growth and the species, and the growing environment.

For instance, it's perhaps a good idea to leave some damaged leaves, or those with some algae if the plant is trying to establish itself.
Once established and new growth starts to come through then it maybe a good time to trim old and damaged growth.
 
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Costa

Member
Joined
20 Oct 2016
Messages
354
Location
Athens, Greece
Although I never got to the point of pruning as my plants usually don't get to grow that much, this is very useful and thank you for putting together
 

ruairimcq

Seedling
Joined
3 Sep 2020
Messages
21
Location
Ireland
I'm having a bit of difficulty figuring out how to best plant Lagenandra meeboldii Red Aquafleur.

Any one any tips?

Sent from my ONEPLUS A6003 using Tapatalk
 

Gulczi

Member
Joined
9 Aug 2020
Messages
29
Location
Poland
If you want your stem plants to branch out and fill a larger area then snip off the very top section and new growth will be diverted to side shoots further down the main stem. This is useful when propagating Ludwigia etc..

I have my first planted tank so Im confused a bit. I need to leave for example L aromatica to grow as high as I want it to be and then cut off the tips to make her more bushy or I cut of the tips as it grows?

I have hard time in making stem plants bushier and at the same time to make them keep leaves on the bottom too
 

tiger15

Member
Joined
14 Mar 2018
Messages
659
Location
USA
I have my first planted tank so Im confused a bit. I need to leave for example L aromatica to grow as high as I want it to be and then cut off the tips to make her more bushy or I cut of the tips as it grows?

I have hard time in making stem plants bushier and at the same time to make them keep leaves on the bottom too.
Stems are high maintenance plant. You can prune the tops to control height and make it more bushy temporarily, but after repeating a few times (some say 7), you have to discard the bottoms and replant the tops to rejuvenate. It’s analogous to some perennials that must be divided often to rejuvenate.

Rihzome plants require the least maintenance. I haven’t pruned my Anubias scape for 3 years other than removing dead yellow leaves and reglueing Nana pettete clumps knocled off by my fish from time to time. Anubias grow slowly and only horizontally, and form grasping roots onto the rock. Even in the dark corners underneath rock and canopy, green leaves emerged to press against the glass wall which in a way contains its expansion. The most maintenance work I have to do is to take care of two potted stems at the right corner. Every few weeks I have to take them out, chop the bottoms, and replant the tops.
 

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