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Planting after filling tank?

Daalamist

Seedling
Joined
14 Nov 2018
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20
Location
UK
I know that generally you plant your plants into the substrate then fill the tank, but because I’m on a super tight budget and this is my first attempt, I was wondering if it’s possible to buy a small amount of the plants I want, plant them, fill the tank, and then buy more plants as I go along, adding them to the substrate with the tank already filled. Is that doable? I will have loads of stupid questions because I’m new at this. Thanks
 

DeiJas

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26 Jan 2018
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Planet Earth
That's what I've done with my previous aquarium and all went very well.
 

Andrew Butler

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1 Feb 2016
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Banbury, Oxfordshire
I know that generally you plant your plants into the substrate then fill the tank, but because I’m on a super tight budget and this is my first attempt, I was wondering if it’s possible to buy a small amount of the plants I want, plant them, fill the tank, and then buy more plants as I go along, adding them to the substrate with the tank already filled. Is that doable? I will have loads of stupid questions because I’m new at this. Thanks
People do that all the time and it's absolutely fine to do. Have a read up on some of the sticky threads about planting etc, these should help you grasp the basics but you will never stop learning. :bookworm:
 

tam

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5 May 2011
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1,106
Yes, you have to remember that most of the fancy videos come from a small minority of skilled (and well budgeted) aquascapers. Most of the general public buy plants on and off - rearrange things, add things, replace something that's not growing well etc. they also often don't buy more than one pot of each type and wait patiently for it to grow in.

You could also looks at plant swaps - good for money saving. If it's carpet plants you can grow them on in soil on your window sill to increase the volume too.
 

Daalamist

Seedling
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14 Nov 2018
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Location
UK
You could also looks at plant swaps - good for money saving. If it's carpet plants you can grow them on in soil on your window sill to increase the volume too.

Oh I didn’t know you could do that! That’ll save a lot of money thanks!




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azawaza

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26 Aug 2018
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Singapore
Get an army of floating plants to reduce lighting while you wait to plant more plants, in case algae gets too comfy in their new ‘home’ ;)
 

Daalamist

Seedling
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Location
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Get an army of floating plants to reduce lighting while you wait to plant more plants, in case algae gets too comfy in their new ‘home’ ;)

I have a dimmer for lamps, could I just dim the light using that?


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Mick.Dk

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19 Jun 2012
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Being on a tight budget, I strongly advise to make sure at least some of your first plants are fast growers. You really want your new tank to mature as fast as possible and plants are promoting this process. Fastgrowing plants will increase the total amount of plant-mass in your tank faster - helping a lot in the process of maturing the tank.
Some of the cheapest fastgrowers would be Elodea densa, Limnophila sessiliflora, Rotala rotundifolia and Cabomba aquatica, to mention a few. Check those, to see if at least one or two can be incorporated in your plant-choise. These are all very easy plants to grow, with very low demands.
Adding some floating plants will not only help in the maturing process of your tank. You can also continuously ever after, monitor that your "underwater-plants" have enough nutrients in a cheap and easy way - have a read about "Duckweed Index".
 

Daalamist

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Thank youuuuuu mick. Fast growers it is


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azawaza

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Singapore
I have a dimmer for lamps, could I just dim the light using that?


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Dimmers help too. But floaters are able to absorb nitrates while your aquatic plants adapt to submerged growth. They also act as increased surface area for beneficial bacteria to multiply.

I use S.Natans and Water Lettuce in my tank. Duck weed helps too but I don’t like them as being too small and pesky.
 

Keith GH

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28 Aug 2017
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Melbourne Australia
Daalamist

When adding more plants I would recommend it be done at a big water change. That means you are topping up with clean water and you tank will become clearer a lot quicker plus less muck in your filter.

Keith:wave::wave:
 

Daalamist

Seedling
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Joined
14 Nov 2018
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20
Location
UK
Dimmers help too. But floaters are able to absorb nitrates while your aquatic plants adapt to submerged growth. They also act as increased surface area for beneficial bacteria to multiply.

I use S.Natans and Water Lettuce in my tank. Duck weed helps too but I don’t like them as being too small and pesky.

Oh I’ll do that for sure then thanks


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