Mini Bonsai - Sekibokka

Discussion in 'Off Topic / Chit-Chat' started by Antoni, 12 Dec 2010.

  1. Antoni

    Antoni Forum Moderator Staff Member

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    Dear friends,

    I just wanted to share with you my new aqcquisition - a friend of mine, brought me from Japan a really nano Bonsai, which accordingly to the label is called Sekibokka /Sekibokka /石木花とは/in translation means "The stone tree and flower". / which from the scantily information I have manage to find, mainly in Japaneese :shifty: is appearing that Sekibokka is a a new style.

    Here some pictures of it:
    Proba%20321.jpg
    macro2.jpg
    Macro1.jpg

    I have recieved also a small "manual" for the litle gem, which gives me some directions for watering, lighting, fertz and etc. but Im curiuos what species of tree is that?

    I have asked on some of the bonsai forums, but nobody seems to know... o_O

    I have also sent an email to the producer, but have not heared from them back. Probably do not speak English.

    Any way it is a very nice litle tree and I will try shaping it a bit, maybe next spring.

    Regards

    Antoni
     
  2. stevec

    stevec Member

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    could be a japonica quince??????????? of somesort
     
  3. Antoni

    Antoni Forum Moderator Staff Member

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    Hi Steve,
    this was one of my assumptions and another guy on a bonsai forum suggest it, but comparing macro shots, I have seen a lot of different leaves varieties. On this picture of Chaenomeles japonica it looks similar:
    Chaenomeles_html_m5b4e60d.png

    Im quite confused a o_O o_O
     
  4. Mark Evans

    Mark Evans Expert

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    This looks great Antoni, is it moss around the base?
     
  5. stevec

    stevec Member

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    there are hundreds of different varieties and crosses but they produce fruits with stones in spring, if its still alive next year :D you might be able to narrow it down
     
  6. Antoni

    Antoni Forum Moderator Staff Member

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    Thanks Mark, yes it is moss arround the base.

    I hope it will make it until next year, Steve :) Fingers crossed!
     
  7. Stu Worrall

    Stu Worrall Forum Moderator Staff Member

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    i posted it to my mate who runs green dragon bonsai and he reckons its Fukien tea - Carmona Macrophylla
     
  8. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

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    *sniggers* :lol:
     
  9. Stu Worrall

    Stu Worrall Forum Moderator Staff Member

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    bad lad :lol:
     
  10. Steve Smith

    Steve Smith Member

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    I love the little clay pot it's in. Very Wabi-sabi :)
     
  11. dw1305

    dw1305 Expert

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    Hi all,
    Definitely could be C. japonica, but I think it might be Pyracantha, which is spiny like Chaenomeles, and a closely related member of the Rosaceae. Both Pyracantha and Chaenomeles are fairly easy as cuttings.

    Pyracantha:
    [​IMG]

    I've thought of a couple more evergreen garden shrubs that are relatively easy cuttings and might do, they are the common variegated Euonymus fortunei, Hedging Lonicera, (Lonicera nitida) and Box (Buxus sempervirens).

    Another thought was Azara serrata (below), which is an easy cutting and has attractively light green "2-ranked" leaves and brown bark. This is a very easy cutting.
    [​IMG]

    cheers Darrel
     
  12. Antoni

    Antoni Forum Moderator Staff Member

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    Thanks stuwarrall, the leaves look similar, but the bark seems to be different and mine has spines.

    Yes it is amazing, such a shame, we can not get this kind of pots over here :(

    Thanks Darrel! well the Pyracantha looks similar, there is a similar rosette with few leaves coming out, but a difference I have noticed is that on mine the tips of the older leaves are splitting in two, a bit like a heart shaped, which is not typical for the Pyracantha/from pictures I have seen so far :) /

    The leaves of the Azara serrata looks different as shape. They are a bit like spear shaped, while Sekibokkas' ones are heart shaped.

    I have passed our suggestions and the pictures of the Sekibokka to friend of mine, who is a botanist. Hope he can help us out too :)

    The manufacturer has not answered my email, probably they do not speak English at all :(
     
  13. wearsbunnyslippers

    wearsbunnyslippers Member

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    i thought mini bonsai were called mame?

    sekibokka must be something new...
     
  14. Antoni

    Antoni Forum Moderator Staff Member

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    Yes,

    from the scantily information available, it seems that this is a new style. Look the beggining of the thread.

    Regards
     
  15. dw1305

    dw1305 Expert

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    Hi all,
    No Azara serrata isn't thorny either, it was a suggestion of a plant that is an easy cutting and might be suitable as a bonsai. If the tip of the leaf on your plant looks like a shallow heart or an "m", then it is almost certainly Pyracantha , as a lot of the leaves do this.

    I'd never heard of Carmona microphylla before, just looked it up, it is interesting straight away botanically as it is a woody member of the Boraginaceae (Forget-me-not Family) and I can't think of any others. Looks like it might be a good house plant as well. I think it's proper latin name is Ehretia microphylla, and that would be a name I have heard of.

    Looks like it will grow either from seed or a soft cutting, and If I was going to try a bonsai it would probably be the one.

    cheers Darrel
     

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