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Fidelia squid: Dutch Aquascape 55ltr

milesjames

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23 Nov 2021
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155
Location
Shrewsbury
Hi everybody,

So as promised this is the first post about my new dutch aquascape entitled "Fidelia squid".

The name is not due to its looks, but a small joke between me and my wife about the grading if entered for competition.

The way I build dutch scapes is a little different as I like to plant the areas in stages adding a few plants at a time. This allows me to make choices on plants thinking about how they visually work together as they grow and gives specific plants a head start.

This scape was using this plant in stages technique. It has been running for about a month with most plants having had at least 1 trim.

Photos attached but please find specs and plant listing below. There will be a layout design posted but for fun, I'll let you spot where things are planted first.


Tank: 55ltr cube nano aquaone
Co2 injected: 3hr morning - 1hr evening
Ferts: twice weekly Fluval grow


Plants:
Pogostemon erectus
Nomaphila siamensis parvifolia
Ludwigia sp mini super red
Rotala wallichii
Staurogyne repen
Lobelia cardinalis
Alternanthera reineckii 'Mini'
Ludwigia Repens
Marsilea Hirsuta

I look forward to sharing its progress over the coming months.
Please share your thoughts on progress and on my unusual startup style.
😊
 

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Angus

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29 Aug 2008
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654
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Vauxhall, London.
Did you plant front to back? or back to front? or neither? what was the planting order and how did you decide what to plant first? i'm assuming planting stems first is a good bet. :) nice job! :thumbup:
 

milesjames

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With my style of planting it is normally aesthetic lead meaning I choose a 3 plant starting point normally a carpeting plant, a focal point plant and a plant that helps to bring the 2 together.

Then I normally sit for a week thinking about the plant zones that surround these 3 plants and start to develop plant choices.

With this tank I felt it best to get slow growers in early after my initial 3 plants, so focused on forground. Though I got lucky as my lfs had a delivery of Nesaea podicellata”Golden” in week 2 (I notice I missed this off plant list apologies) so got this in early.

By week 4 I had filled all zones ending with the Pogostemon erectus to lighten the scape. Though this choice and the amount of space committed to the ludwigia sp mini super red are really where my scape would be disqualified at comp level.

Hence the scape name.

Over time I believe these choices that would potentially lead to disqualification will be ok. As I intend plants to be trimmed to obscure, this should create a better balance of colour. Potentially I will also add or remove a specific zone to ensure contrast between pogostemon erectus and rotala wallichii.

I will add the weekly planting schedule on next post. Hope all made sense on how I approached this scape let me know what you think and if you would trial this style.
 

milesjames

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23 Nov 2021
Messages
155
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Shrewsbury
Weekly planting schedule since start:

Week 1:
rotala wallichii
Lobelia cardinalis
Marsilea Hirsuta

Scape design was always to create a column of tall stems in the middle Rotala Wallichii was chosen due to its broad nature and subtle leaves. I felt this would contrast well with whatever my future choice might be for the main focal plant.

Lobelia cardinalis was planted over 3 zones at first this allowed them to gain maximum light and I was able to propagate it. This planting over known future zones is something I like to do as it keeps the tank looking nice and prevents me from filling zones too quickly.

Marsilea Hirsuta was planted, this was added to all intended zones and allowed to spread where it wanted later I trimmed out of zones not intended and replanted in the front to increase density.

Week 2:
Staurogyne repen
Alternanthera reineckii 'Mini'
Nesaea podicellata”Golden”

As mentioned before, this week I had a bit of a lucky moment my LFS (Maidenhead aquatics Shrewsbury) got Nesaea podicellata ”Golden” in, which was the perfect plant for my focal point. So this was planted in the central point to complete the intended column.

Staurogyne repens were then added thess were planted in the intended zone but some weaker plants were added to grow out zone with cardinalis to allow for them to grow out before being added to the correct zone.

Alternanthera reineckii 'mini' was planted to add contrast between repens and central plants. Now you will notice this is on both sides of the repens this is actually not a correct dutch choice but as I'm sure we all feel when planting wasting plants feels like a crime. So for now this will be maintained and I will either create a u-shaped street around the repens or I may move once grown out to another tank.
 

erwin123

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4 Mar 2021
Messages
1,064
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Singapore
I'm very interested in how the plants grow.

Also can you give more details on lighting and CO2, and whether you are dosing Fluval Grow at the recommended dosage or higher?
 

milesjames

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Weekly planting schedule part 2:

Week 3: Red plant weakness week

Prior to my planting for this week I took the time to bring all the plants in grow out zones out of the background leaving just 1 patch of plants still growing these were the weak staurogyne repens and lobelia cardinalis that had been propergated.

Ludwigia Repens Rubin
Ludwigia sp mini super red

This week was probably where I would say my scape became off track dutch wise (still is) I had been contemplating what to do with background zones and had many ideas but....

When I arrived at my LFS I found they had bought in a array of red plants that were really healthy and tbh would have been hard to get at a similar health/size. So as we all have in the past I got red plant fever, I bought up all of the healthy plants I could immediately saying to myself its ok I can make this work. This lead to what I can only describe as a wall of red plants occurring at the back of the tank across all background zones.

This was a disaster visually and as soon as I planted them I went nope I cant make this work, but lets keep things healthy and leave planted for the week.

Over this week I felt my initial thoughts around having the column mainly hide the reds was still a good idea, but required the reds to be densily packed into the top right and to loose half to other scapes. Then order the final plants for zones thinking about how to balance what had become an intensely red scape.

Week 4:

In this week all grow out zones were emptied with plants either joining there correct zone or being rehomed to other tanks. All plants that required trimming had first trim and Marsilea Hirsuta was brought under control.

Pogostemon erectus
Nomaphila siamensis parvifolia

I choose Pogostemon erectus for rear left to help balance the tank colour scheme and eliminate the red wall effect for my previous weeks red plant excitement. My hope is the Ludwigia Repens Rubin will be calmed palete wise by the pogostemon erectus and rotala wallichii working together.

Finally nomaphila siamensis parvifolia in the foreground. This I'm sure you will all agree would appear to be a strange choice for a nano tank foreground plant given when it is fully grown will become far larger then is normally suited. I'll explain this choice later in this journal as its going to be a lot to explain in this reply.

Obvuiously I will be showing progress explaining any changes to to scape as it progresses but for now I'd love to hear thoughts all your thoughts on planting style, plant choices, thoughts on how to improve and any obviously errors you think I have made that could lead to longer term problems.

Thanks for reading all!!!!
 

milesjames

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155
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Shrewsbury
Thanks, @erwin123 and @Wolf6 for your interest and questions around lighting, CO2 and ferts.

I think this section is going to be a difficult one for me to explain, not for lack of understanding but I am breaking nearly all rules in these three areas.

This is due to my Scape being in a nano tank, the equipment I use and personal choices.

My lights are actually in the low tech range, they are a basic product that produces only 15W but a full spectrum. This is something I may update as the scape progresses but actually having low tech is actually quite helpful. I run my lights for 11hrs a day, this is mainly because my wife hates not having the lights on, which makes having low tech lights a good option for me.

Doing this does pose a number of problems algae prevention being the obvious one the other being the photoperiod being very long and slow.

Due to this it impacts how I fertilise my tank and add CO2.

As mentioned due to this being a nano tank CO2 injection can become problematic this is equally challenging due to the lighting. To combat this I actually take a simple approach which is to inject twice daily 3hrs in the morning and for 1 hr in the evening timing dependent on what the tank is measuring when I return from work. I normally start the morning injection 1 hr before lights on then turning off 2hrs after this allows for a good level of CO2 to be available for plants in the day.

Now fertilising is a whole other challenge as mentioned above one of the biggest challenges is balancing the tank and preventing algae due to the photoperiod being too long really. One of the ways I have managed this is through a low fert regime when starting a new tank. I normally only fertilise twice a week after a water change. This is because I always want to drop the nitrate levels before fertilizing to reduce the potential for algae. I have used flourish root tabs every 10cm across the whole tank to help with the low liquid ferts all of this will change with time as plants develop.

Now every aquarist on this site will now be shouting at their screen, as what I have just listed is blasphemy to some. This being said lot of what I do with these areas is really dependent on the stage of the tank and plant health. I will change things up and over time I will be looking to make these areas more consistent to ensure optimum growth/plant health.

Thanks again for your interest :)
 

erwin123

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1,064
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Singapore
Now fertilising is a whole other challenge as mentioned above one of the biggest challenges is balancing the tank and preventing algae due to the photoperiod being too long really. One of the ways I have managed this is through a low fert regime when starting a new tank. I normally only fertilise twice a week after a water change. This is because I always want to drop the nitrate levels before fertilizing to reduce the potential for algae. I have used flourish root tabs every 10cm across the whole tank to help with the low liquid ferts all of this will change with time as plants develop.
The quantity of ferts used is more important than the frequency... can you share the weekly quantity of Fluval Gro you add to the tank so that we can translate to ppm NO3?

Anyway, everything seems to be in balance - you are dosing less ferts (this is an assumption as you haven't stated how much Fluval Gro you are dumping into your tank and what you think is 'lean' someone might think is not lean... and so on... its a sensitive topic 😅) , but at the same time you are using less light, which is important....

Thanks for sharing the details... i'm also growing Pedicatella (I now have 3 different types of Ammannia in my tank) and want to get more data points on whether it does better in lean water column dosing.
 
Last edited:

milesjames

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23 Nov 2021
Messages
155
Location
Shrewsbury
The quantity of ferts used is more important than the frequency... can you share the weekly quantity of Fluval Gro you add to the tank so that we can translate to ppm NO3?

Anyway, everything seems to be in balance - you are dosing less ferts (this is an assumption as you haven't stated how much Fluval Gro you are dumping into your tank and what you think is 'lean' someone might think is not lean... and so on... its a sensitive topic 😅) , but at the same time you are using less light, which is important....

Thanks for sharing the details... i'm also growing Pedicatella (I now have 3 different types of Ammannia in my tank) and want to get more data points on whether it does better in lean water column dosing.
Of course no problems, you are right I go lean on ferts I dose 1ml twice weekly.
 

milesjames

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Thread starter
Joined
23 Nov 2021
Messages
155
Location
Shrewsbury
With my style of planting it is normally aesthetic lead meaning I choose a 3 plant starting point normally a carpeting plant, a focal point plant and a plant that helps to bring the 2 together.

Then I normally sit for a week thinking about the plant zones that surround these 3 plants and start to develop plant choices.

With this tank I felt it best to get slow growers in early after my initial 3 plants, so focused on forground. Though I got lucky as my lfs had a delivery of Nesaea podicellata”Golden” in week 2 (I notice I missed this off plant list apologies) so got this in early.

By week 4 I had filled all zones ending with the Pogostemon erectus to lighten the scape. Though this choice and the amount of space committed to the ludwigia sp mini super red are really where my scape would be disqualified at comp level.

Hence the scape name.

Over time I believe these choices that would potentially lead to disqualification will be ok. As I intend plants to be trimmed to obscure, this should create a better balance of colour. Potentially I will also add or remove a specific zone to ensure contrast between pogostemon erectus and rotala wallichii.

I will add the weekly planting schedule on next post. Hope all made sense on how I approached this scape let me know what you think and if you would trial this style.
@Angus apologies forgot to tag you on this post hope this answers questions on planting style.
 

milesjames

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Thread starter
Joined
23 Nov 2021
Messages
155
Location
Shrewsbury
The quantity of ferts used is more important than the frequency... can you share the weekly quantity of Fluval Gro you add to the tank so that we can translate to ppm NO3?

Anyway, everything seems to be in balance - you are dosing less ferts (this is an assumption as you haven't stated how much Fluval Gro you are dumping into your tank and what you think is 'lean' someone might think is not lean... and so on... its a sensitive topic 😅) , but at the same time you are using less light, which is important....

Thanks for sharing the details... i'm also growing Pedicatella (I now have 3 different types of Ammannia in my tank) and want to get more data points on whether it does better in lean water column dosing.
Hi Erwin

Just taken a look at your tanks on your feed I can see why your asking we appear to be growing alot of plants in common.

Thought I'd post back about your question again as I'm sure you would like a little more details on plant growth rate and general health.

I'm finding that my Nesaea podicellata Golden is growing in well leaf shape is good on new growth. Though I'm finding it's struggling a bit with lower areas of the stem due to low lighting and planting possibly being a bit tight.

Ludwigia sp mini super red is colouring up well not producing any roots on stem. It is likely this is due to me adding alot of root tabs in this area.

Think the plant that's been the real struggle for me has been the Rotala wallichii. This is because I got a little concerned on growth at start due to it getting hit with algae, so decided to cut back to ground and replant. This meant its taken a long time to re-establish, but is now taking off well.

I'll post some plant updates with pics shortly, but hope this helps with getting some ideas on ferts etc. for your own tanks.
 

milesjames

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So let's talk algea...
Its going to be a player in any tank whether we like it or not you can have the most balanced tank in the world, you can have the heaviest plant tank you can, you can even keep your light, ferts and co2 consist but algea like any nature will find a way.

As you know I've had a good run so far but its started as the scape has developed the wonderful BBA. ..

This animal is something I have grown to know well. Most of you will be thinking time to get the liquid carbon out.

Well this time I am denying my self this simple pleasure of the cillt bang method of sorting this problem.

Instead I'm opting for the find the root cause sort it and trim trim trim method.

So this I hope will be interesting for those who have or are suffering and will help people understand algea can be caused by hidden problems and those we have learnt to look for.

So let's list what I have have found on my problem solving journey so far:

1. An obvious one change. I have recently changed from low to high dosing of ferts all other areas have been adjusted to accommodate for this but the change will as expected trigger algea issues. I am continuing as intended and see this a more a trigger than a cause.

2. Biological matter settling in new low flow areas. As this tank is not new to me the low flow areas are well known to me. I do try and plant with this in mind. How this flow is affected by plants once they grow in is always a interesting surprise. I created wider separations between plant species and and replanted zones to allow better flow.

3. Hidden biologicals. I run a integrated sump like filter but I have had times where leaves have got into heater and pump areas due water flowing over the seperator. Even though I feel I am pritty go at netting this out. I have found that some have sunk and have melted in the pump area. This subsequently has created a algea creating monster of a pump and trust me I was surprised on how much was there whilst vacuuming it out.

4. Food capture zones. We all know that excess food is a killer and my clean up crew are excellent at sorting this out. This said denser carpeting plants can be a massive player in food capture and even my clean up crew can opt for easier accessible food then rooting through densely planted areas. I simply trimmed seperated and vacuumed the areas

5. A classic simply old non aquatic leaves on stem plants. A normal problem sorted simplely with the cut to ground trim the old off plant the freah method.

Any way thought this be a nice update as its an issue we all have let me know of any algea issues you have had, what were the core issues that caused it and how you treated it!!
 

erwin123

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4 Mar 2021
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1,064
Location
Singapore
1. An obvious one change. I have recently changed from low to high dosing of ferts all other areas have been adjusted to accommodate for this but the change will as expected trigger algea issues. I am continuing as intended and see this a more a trigger than a cause.
In UKAPS we learn that Ferts don't cause algae. When you say "all other areas have been adjusted to accommodate" for more ferts, are you saying that you increased the light? In this forum I've learnt that its usually the light, not ferts that triggers algae.

Before increasing light intensity we must be confident of 3 things:
  • CO2 profile is good. >1.0pH drop at lights on. Variance of up to 0.1pH throughout photo period
  • Water Flow is good and reaches all areas of the tank, especially the substrate.
  • Good tank maintenance regime - weekly 50% WC and vaccum the substrate
If you read my journal, you'll see that at one point I increased my lights too much (an article said Rotala Floridas need more light) when the above 3 items were not good enough and I got an algae outbreak. I had to do a 72-hour blackout to recover, which was a good learning experience.
If all 3 are good, slowly increase lighting 1% at a time.
I can honestly say I really don't worry that much about dead leaves. If they are blocking my Lily pipe intake, i'll have to remove them, but otherwise, they are removed when I clean my canister filter every 5 weeks (good flow helps get the dead leaves into the filter).
Anyway, would love to see a photo of your Ammannia Pedicatella Golden, hope its doing well!
 

milesjames

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Thread starter
Joined
23 Nov 2021
Messages
155
Location
Shrewsbury
In UKAPS we learn that Ferts don't cause algae. When you say "all other areas have been adjusted to accommodate" for more ferts, are you saying that you increased the light? In this forum I've learnt that its usually the light, not ferts that triggers algae.

Before increasing light intensity we must be confident of 3 things:
  • CO2 profile is good. >1.0pH drop at lights on. Variance of up to 0.1pH throughout photo period
  • Water Flow is good and reaches all areas of the tank, especially the substrate.
  • Good tank maintenance regime - weekly 50% WC and vaccum the substrate
If you read my journal, you'll see that at one point I increased my lights too much (an article said Rotala Floridas need more light) when the above 3 items were not good enough and I got an algae outbreak. I had to do a 72-hour blackout to recover, which was a good learning experience.
If all 3 are good, slowly increase lighting 1% at a time.
I can honestly say I really don't worry that much about dead leaves. If they are blocking my Lily pipe intake, i'll have to remove them, but otherwise, they are removed when I clean my canister filter every 5 weeks (good flow helps get the dead leaves into the filter).
Anyway, would love to see a photo of your Ammannia Pedicatella Golden, hope its doing well!
Hi erwin,
Thanks for your post and interest as always.

This is just a quick post to say that some good points made though I think I will have to put a post together for you about specifics. All you have said is true but if you consider the plant types, scape style and the fact that it is BBA things change a little.

I heading out now but will put something together for you later.

Don't worry the Ammannia Pedicatella Golden is doing great 😉
 

Wolf6

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Joined
18 Dec 2014
Messages
955
Location
Netherlands
So let's talk algea...
Its going to be a player in any tank whether we like it or not you can have the most balanced tank in the world, you can have the heaviest plant tank you can, you can even keep your light, ferts and co2 consist but algea like any nature will find a way.

As you know I've had a good run so far but its started as the scape has developed the wonderful BBA. ..

This animal is something I have grown to know well. Most of you will be thinking time to get the liquid carbon out.

Well this time I am denying my self this simple pleasure of the cillt bang method of sorting this problem.

Instead I'm opting for the find the root cause sort it and trim trim trim method.

So this I hope will be interesting for those who have or are suffering and will help people understand algea can be caused by hidden problems and those we have learnt to look for.

So let's list what I have have found on my problem solving journey so far:

1. An obvious one change. I have recently changed from low to high dosing of ferts all other areas have been adjusted to accommodate for this but the change will as expected trigger algea issues. I am continuing as intended and see this a more a trigger than a cause.

2. Biological matter settling in new low flow areas. As this tank is not new to me the low flow areas are well known to me. I do try and plant with this in mind. How this flow is affected by plants once they grow in is always a interesting surprise. I created wider separations between plant species and and replanted zones to allow better flow.

3. Hidden biologicals. I run a integrated sump like filter but I have had times where leaves have got into heater and pump areas due water flowing over the seperator. Even though I feel I am pritty go at netting this out. I have found that some have sunk and have melted in the pump area. This subsequently has created a algea creating monster of a pump and trust me I was surprised on how much was there whilst vacuuming it out.

4. Food capture zones. We all know that excess food is a killer and my clean up crew are excellent at sorting this out. This said denser carpeting plants can be a massive player in food capture and even my clean up crew can opt for easier accessible food then rooting through densely planted areas. I simply trimmed seperated and vacuumed the areas

5. A classic simply old non aquatic leaves on stem plants. A normal problem sorted simplely with the cut to ground trim the old off plant the freah method.

Any way thought this be a nice update as its an issue we all have let me know of any algea issues you have had, what were the core issues that caused it and how you treated it!!
Spot dosing easycarbo to me is merely a method to keep it contained while you work to fix the cause. Its the finger that plugs the hole until the dyke is reinforced. At least that is how i regard it. No point in allowing the place to be flooded while I fix the leak :) curious to see how your experiment will go, if it leads to easier bba eradication. Good luck!
 

milesjames

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Spot dosing easycarbo to me is merely a method to keep it contained while you work to fix the cause. Its the finger that plugs the hole until the dyke is reinforced. At least that is how i regard it. No point in allowing the place to be flooded while I fix the leak :) curious to see how your experiment will go, if it leads to easier bba eradication. Good luck!
Thanks Wolf 😊
 

milesjames

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Thread starter
Joined
23 Nov 2021
Messages
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Location
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In UKAPS we learn that Ferts don't cause algae. When you say "all other areas have been adjusted to accommodate" for more ferts, are you saying that you increased the light? In this forum I've learnt that its usually the light, not ferts that triggers algae.

Before increasing light intensity we must be confident of 3 things:
  • CO2 profile is good. >1.0pH drop at lights on. Variance of up to 0.1pH throughout photo period
  • Water Flow is good and reaches all areas of the tank, especially the substrate.
  • Good tank maintenance regime - weekly 50% WC and vaccum the substrate
If you read my journal, you'll see that at one point I increased my lights too much (an article said Rotala Floridas need more light) when the above 3 items were not good enough and I got an algae outbreak. I had to do a 72-hour blackout to recover, which was a good learning experience.
If all 3 are good, slowly increase lighting 1% at a time.
I can honestly say I really don't worry that much about dead leaves. If they are blocking my Lily pipe intake, i'll have to remove them, but otherwise, they are removed when I clean my canister filter every 5 weeks (good flow helps get the dead leaves into the filter).
Anyway, would love to see a photo of your Ammannia Pedicatella Golden, hope its doing well!
Hi Erwin,

So about what I mentioned regarding my algae issues. As you are aware I use a all in one fertiliser (fluvel grow) and take a less technical approach to dosing. I prefer the style promoted by Green aqua which is start at the recommended fertilisation levels and increase/decrease to suit identifying need through visual indicators. I know there are more technical ways but I'm not going to be measuring elements and dosing specifically.

You are correct in that with most algea, ferts don't normally contribute to increases. Sadly BBA is not one of those algea's there are a number of elements that increase its presence but the main one is actually iron allowing it to gain its bushy appearance. Please find reference to BBA and ferts article below:


As for flow you are absolutely correct, you want good flow throughout. Sadly I am working in a nano 55ltr tank and this is an issue. Low flow zones rest in central areas and increasing through motors would not only be impracticable but would damage my stems.

Additional flow related issues occur when scaped in specific ways due to streets/plant groupings being dense restricting flow to specific areas.

This is reflected in where I find the BBA as communly it is in the densely grown slower growers in front of taller dense areas.

There are other contrubors to why this is an area for BBA such as settling food and biological waste but this is really a cause of flow. Though I added it separately as plants in high flow areas but are densely packed such as my Marsilea Hirsutahave is affected by this.

I imagine this is a common issue for dutch style scapes hence the rules being about 1 cm spacings and plant shaping techniques.

As for weekly water changes I do 2 a week 1 drain and 1 vac both 50%. Vacuuming is a challenge due to density of plants in areas and I can't vac direct substrate as I'm using a fine silt like soil. So those tricky low flow/caputure zones are a pest to manage well.

Finally lighting I have upgraded my lights and over 2 weeks I have slowly increased the lighting intensity along with Co2 and ferts. But as mentioned I use green machine method of increasing from a baseline reviewing daily so this enviably comes with teething issues when I change things.

Fortunately this BBA was found as a light dusting on leaves in specific area's. Not a full on break out so I'm handling it, will update you on results or be asking you advice if further issues occur 😊

Next post will be a picture update you will love the colour I'm getting on the golden!!
 

erwin123

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Joined
4 Mar 2021
Messages
1,064
Location
Singapore
Hi Erwin,

You are correct in that with most algea, ferts don't normally contribute to increases. Sadly BBA is not one of those algea's there are a number of elements that increase its presence but the main one is actually iron allowing it to gain its bushy appearance. Please find reference to BBA and ferts article below:


I would say you have to be careful about old websites (the year on the page at the bottom suggests it was last updated in 2007) as the state of knowledge 14 years ago is very different than now. Discovering the updated current state of knowledge on planted tanks in UKAPS, 2hr Aquarist, and Barr Report has been an eye-opener for me.

I would say that as early as 10 years ago which was when I first started my planted tank, it was "accepted knowledge" that too much ferts cause algae and people do water change to get rid of excess ferts,etc....

My own experience with BBA problems have (1) organic waste related - needed to do several rounds of vacuuming my 10 year old substrate and (2) CO2 related - I'm sending one of my CO2 tanks for refill, pressure has been dropping as its rapidly emptying and even though its dual stage, the CO2 being delivered to the diffuser nevertheless appears to have been affected (i.e. less CO2 in tank, pH did not drop as much).

Waiting for a photo of your tank, please show all the plants not just the Golden! Quite a few Dutch style fans here!
 
Last edited:

milesjames

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Joined
23 Nov 2021
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155
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Shrewsbury
Hi Erwi
I would say you have to be careful about old websites (the year on the page at the bottom suggests it was last updated in 2007) as the state of knowledge 14 years ago is very different than now. Discovering the updated current state of knowledge on planted tanks in UKAPS, 2hr Aquarist, and Barr Report has been an eye-opener for me.

I would say that as early as 10 years ago which was when I first started my planted tank, it was "accepted knowledge" that too much ferts cause algae and people do water change to get rid of excess ferts,etc....

My own experience with BBA problems have (1) organic waste related - needed to do several rounds of vacuuming my 10 year old substrate and (2) CO2 related - I'm sending one of my CO2 tanks for refill, pressure has been dropping as its rapidly emptying and even though its dual stage, the CO2 being delivered to the diffuser nevertheless appears to have been affected (i.e. less CO2 in tank, pH did not drop as much).

Waiting for a photo of your tank, please show all the plants not just the Golden! Quite a few Dutch style fans here!
Hi Erwin,

Sorry to bang on about the ferts and BBA bit but the iron part is actually something I picked up in another artical. Please find link below:


I'll try upload photos today 😊
 
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