Ultra-wide angle (UWA) and aquascaping

Dan Crawford

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Great discussion folks. Can I chuck this in the mix please?

Just for fun, and to quickly see if using UWA badly can still create an added sense of depth and or scale....

This was taken on a 5DmkII, so a full frame sensor at 15mm. Shooting so wide has made this proportions of my new tank look very strange and it also appears to have dwarfed the whole aquascape, quite the opposite of what I expected.

can anyone guess the size of the tank?, the edges of the glass aren't quite in the shot but in real life it's got only 2cm missing off the photo.
Picture1-22.png
 
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No guesses on the tank size but isn't 15mm on a full frame normally a fisheye. Or put another way shouldn't the image be round or have you doctored it. I'm aware you can use Lightroom for example to produce rectilinear images from a fisheye lens.
 

BigTom

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Aqua sobriquet said:
No guesses on the tank size but isn't 15mm on a full frame normally a fisheye. Or put another way shouldn't the image be round or have you doctored it. I'm aware you can use Lightroom for example to produce rectilinear images from a fisheye lens.

Depends on the lens design. 15mm fullframe is roughly equivalent to 10mm on a crop sensor, which is normally the limit for ultra wide angle zooms. Think there's a Sigma that gets down to 8mm without being fisheye.

Fisheyes tend to cover the same sort of focal lengths, but have different lens elements to exaggerate, rather than correct the distortion.
 

BigTom

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Aqua sobriquet said:
Don't know about Sigma but Canon list their EF15mm as a Fisheye.

BigTom said:
Fisheyes tend to cover the same sort of focal lengths, but have different lens elements to exaggerate, rather than correct the distortion.

Focal length doesn't define whether or not it's a fisheye (although fisheyes do tend to be quite wide), the internal construction of the lens does.

For example, here is a non-fisheye image which has had no adjustments in Photoshop (other than the B&W treatment), shot at 10mm.

View_towards_Eyam_moor_by_HairyToes.jpg


EDIT - just realised you were refering to Mark's lens, I misunderstood you, sorry!

Not sure if Mark is actually using the 15mm fisheye, or if it's a wide angle zoom at 15mm (I suspect the latter).
 
A

Antipofish

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Dan Crawford said:
Great discussion folks. Can I chuck this in the mix please?

Just for fun, and to quickly see if using UWA badly can still create an added sense of depth and or scale....

This was taken on a 5DmkII, so a full frame sensor at 15mm. Shooting so wide has made this proportions of my new tank look very strange and it also appears to have dwarfed the whole aquascape, quite the opposite of what I expected.

can anyone guess the size of the tank?, the edges of the glass aren't quite in the shot but in real life it's got only 2cm missing off the photo.
Picture1-22.png


45cm long ?
 

clonitza

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Brasov / Romania
I think in this kind of layouts you can use UWA to further improve the depth of the aquascape just because it brings sides closer and pushes the center further away.

31584_400wh.jpg
 
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