Ready To Throw In the Towel

Discussion in 'Algae' started by mark4785, 18 Apr 2011.

  1. spyder

    spyder Member

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    That shot with the spawn is nice to see and a good sign. :thumbup:

    I'm suffering the same kind of algae on some creeping jenny stems along with some anubias. I'm tweaking flow to see if it helps so still following this thread to see how yours is dealt with. I'm trimming them and removing infected leaves and replanting the tips.

    Hope the pros chip in soon.
     
  2. nayr88

    nayr88 Member

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    mate thing is everyone has including sir ceg,

    so how much or what has been advised have you done??
    cheers
     
  3. CeeJay

    CeeJay Member

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    Hi mark4785

    Still looks like a CO2 issue to me, not getting sufficient amounts to the bottom of the tank.
    On a previous set up of mine, I found that slow growing plants seemed to be affected like yours (Anubias in my case), so I moved them to a shadier part of the tank, and after removing infected leaves, that solved my problem in that case.
    As your plants are in a fully lit position, your last option is to lower the light.

    One of the'unidentifiable algae' in pic 4 looks like GSA to me. It's also in the pic of that lovely looking Ram. Upping the PO4 will sort that out.

    When I used to use glass drop checkers, I used to paint the back of them with Tippex which made it easier to see the colour. It used to peel off after a time but I just repainted it as and when required.
     
  4. mark4785

    mark4785 Member

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    I've now increased my PO4 dosage level (from 10ppm to 15ppm; 10ppm when added to my 120LT tank equates to 2ppm of phosphate) and it would appear that there's no change in the amount of GSA (green string algae?) growing. It attacks the anubias and some other slow-growers like you've mentioned already effectively killing them.

    This problem still is ongoing despite lowering the light level by introducing around 40 floating Amazon frogbit has previously suggested.

    So it looks to me like increasing PO4 and creating more shade doesn't appear to be one of the causes of the algae problem, or am I wrong?

    As for c02 distribution, my new drop-checker is indicating a yellow colour. My old drop-checker by Dennerle never went yellow so I'm kinda starting to question how useful DC's are if there are variations like this that occur. I'm moving my new DC around the aquarium to ascertain what the c02 levels are like; so far it appears the right handside of the tank has over 30ppm of c02 (hence the yellow colour). Can too much c02 induce algae?

    One other thing that has developed recently is a black algae (maybe black beard algae?). Odd bits of it appear in the sand and wrap around it and a mass of small bits of it have appeared on the back pane of glass ever since my Limnophila sessiflora has become dense. I know that getting c02 to these areas would stop it from growing but there's only so many areas powerheads can reach right? :?
     
  5. Johno2090

    Johno2090 Member

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    From your last post about ordering the plants it can't be more than 10 days since you introduced the Frogbit or increased the dosing of PO4. Aquariums require patience and stabilizability things don't and won't get better overnight keep doing everything like your supposed to, Keep on top of water changes and make sure the dosing regime is good and it will sort itself out! Just give it time.

    And also listen to the advice given freely! Its worth more than you can imagine these guys have been messing up and growing algae way before you or I decided to have a go!
     
  6. CeeJay

    CeeJay Member

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    Hi all
    We seem to be at cross purposes here. GSA is Green Spot Algae. The stuff on your glass in pic 4 you posted earlier.

    Any 'string' or hair algae is usually CO2 related.

    This is good, if your fish can handle it.

    No. 100%.

    Now this is definitely CO2 related and caused by fluctuating CO2.

    Now these are definitely steps in the right direction. The frogbit will multiply soon to give you even more shade. Then you can remove some every now and again to keep the light levels lower so as not to be problematic.
    Your best bet now will be to remove as much algae as you can manually, and keep up with the water changes. It appears you are doing all the right things, so don't lose heart at this stage.

    I know I was :lol:, but as long as we learn from our mistakes, all is good :D

    Stick with it, as the rewards are worth it in the end.
     
  7. mark4785

    mark4785 Member

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    Thanks for the response.

    I think I remember someone saying more than one W/C per week causes more harm than good since it removes some of the macro-nutrients and c02 which are the things that are essential to the plants. I try to remove as much algae as possible every day; I'm most untaggling a whitish thread algae from the stems as well as chopping leaves off that are completely covered in green hair/string algae.

    I only do one 50% W/C on a monday at the end of the EI-dosing cycle. Should I be doing more W/C's?

    Also, I recall someone mentioning that inline diffusers are better at diffusing c02. Is it possible to get one of those working in harmony with one of my internal filters as they seem to be designed for externals?

    After lowering the light using the Frogbit, I've noticed my Limnophilla plants are growing more stringy and developing more side shoots. I don't really want to get rid of my Limnophilla because it's my favourite plant. Either the Frogbit or Limnophilla needs to be removed? :woot:
     
  8. CeeJay

    CeeJay Member

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    Hi mark4785
    The water change is your best friend when it comes to battling algae. The more the merrier. I'm not quite as mad as Clive yet, with fish flapping around on the substrate :lol:, but I now think nothing of doing 80% water changes every week. I wanna keep my tank clean :D .
    The usual 50% water change is usually done at the start of the EI cycle, not at the end. You do your water change, then dose. Then on the 2 days you don't dose, the plants will use some of the excess ferts that were fed during the previous 5 days until the next water change.
    I tend to do my water changes before lights on, and on rare occassions, after lights out, so as not to affect the CO2 cycle.

    The in-lines tend to be designed only for external filters.

    I have Limnophilla growing in a low light (1wpg), no CO2 tank, and that is growing fine. Slow but fine.
    Your plants will now be adapting to their new conditions, so you may have to give it some time, usually some 2-3 weeks before the plants fully adapt.
     
  9. mark4785

    mark4785 Member

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    Ok, so when would you suggest for me to do an additional W/C? I say I do a 50% W/C at the end of the EI cycle because Monday's the last day of the EI cycle, but you're right in saying Monday could be interpreted as the beginning of a new cycle as well. :crazy:

    I dose on Monday (Macro with 50% W/C), Tuesday (Micro), Wednesday (Macro), Thursday (Micro), Friday (Macro) and Saturday (Micro). So there's only one day (Sunday) where nothing is dosed.
     
  10. CeeJay

    CeeJay Member

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    Hi mark4785

    I would stick an additional one in around Thursday, roughly in the middle.

    I used to dose Macros on days 1, 3 & 5 and Trace on days 2 & 4. Nothing on day 6 & 7. No harm having an extra bit of Trace floating around :D
     
  11. Morgan Freeman

    Morgan Freeman Member

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    Any news on the tank Mark?
     
  12. mark4785

    mark4785 Member

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    Hi,

    I've been quite busy with college work lately so I haven't had chance to contribute to this thread so much.

    I have, as suggested in this thread, purchased lots of Amazon frogbit in order to lower the light levels. The result is that I have no form of hair/string algae growing on and killing plant leaves.

    The only issue I have at the moment is black beard algae growing on the edges of leaves and on the back pane of glass. In response to this, I'm dosing 6ml of Easycarbo and I've slightly upped the rate of c02 diffusion, although I'm not confident this will be enough. I'm thinking the BBA may be the result of a circulation issue but this is something that I don't know how to rectify in the tank environment I've got. For instance, I have a reliable c02 diffuser, 2 powerheads are circulating the c02 and nutrients; what more can I do to further enhance circulation?

    Another issue I have is with the limnophila sessiflora plant which is growing more stringy. It's not losing it's colour or dieing so hopefully I can continue to keep it in the low light environment.

    Pictures of Black Beard Algae (BBA):
    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    General aquarium picture:

    [​IMG]
     
  13. nayr88

    nayr88 Member

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    Hello mark,

    Looks loads better, and the huge amount of frogbit looks really good, would be cool to have a huge group of nano fish in there they'd love it.

    The BBA can be a relentless mother !! I trim any leaves of as soon as I notice them. I got it on an area my outlet was pointing directly at and with the co2 being pumped through the filter I didn't understand it, that's was for sure where the flow was strongest and co2 enriched and it the leaves where getting coverd in the BBA. I had a little move around and dosed some liquid carbon and it went....
     
  14. spyder

    spyder Member

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    I've been battling this algae too in my low tech nano. I also had plenty of frogbit in there, shrimp love it.

    Tweaked flow and got my Easycarbo in stock. 1 week later it's a reddy orangey colour. I remove badly infected leaves and algae at water changes. Currently running 7hr photopriod 4pm-11pm.

    Your tank is looking a lot healthier. You can trim those stems at the back and replant the trinnmings.
     
  15. mark4785

    mark4785 Member

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    Thanks for your suggestions.

    My photoperiod lasts between 5pm and 11pm so there's only 6 hours of light. I always thought algae was associated with photoperiods over 8 hours.

    I do keep trimming the Limnophila stems, but seeing as it's a plant that thrives in high light, the recent changes I've made which lower the light levels is causing it to grow very thin stems. Consequently, I'm not wanting to keep the cuttings for planting; instead I'm looking for other plants which have larger leaves and which grow well in a variety of light intensities.

    Hi Nayr88,

    I guess I'll just position the powerheads somewhere else in the aquarium until I find that it's distributing the c02 and nutrients properly. My HC that I've planted typically dies fast from c02/nutrient issues so I'm going to keep a close eye on how it develops.

    I agree that the Frogbit looks good, however, I'm having to throw lot's of clumps away since the foilage expands really quickly. The root system also grows very quick and can sometimes get tangled on the Limnophilla. Sadly, I found that the frogbit doesn't grow too well in my outdoor pond; my orfe and koi have took to eating it, and when this doesn't happen, the chlorophyl starts to look as though it's on it's way out.
     
  16. nayr88

    nayr88 Member

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    Could always chuck it on here for donation or postage :)

    Doing well mate keep it up.
     
  17. mark4785

    mark4785 Member

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    I was thinking of selling it on eBay for a small fee. I have to throw 10-20 pieces away every 3-4 days.


    Unfortunately, another issue has cropped up in the aquarium, namely, holes in the leaves of this plant: http://www.aquaessentials.co.uk/index.p ... ts_id=4269

    Here are some pictures I've taken of the holes, appearing on two separate leaves:

    1. [​IMG]

    2. [​IMG]

    The plant is growing very well, I've noticed that two new leaves that are a red colour have popped up in a short space of time so I know the plant isn't dieing; thats why I'm puzzled by these holes that are appearing.

    Any ideas what could be causing the holes? Hopefully my Otto's aren't capable of creating them.
     
  18. mark4785

    mark4785 Member

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    Any ideas? :bored:
     

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