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Cabinet on castors

nduli

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26 Oct 2011
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496
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Bury
Guys has anyone in here mounted their cabinet and tank on castors? I am considering it to allow me to move it around a little for ease of access. I am aware of the stress it may cause but looking for small movements for rear access particularly when there has been a spill. If I was going for castors they would be large ones with brakes and able to support the full tank weight with water on one castor.

Any thoughts?
 

oldbloke

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23 May 2013
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As long as there are enough of them to give proper support, as long as they are placed correctly, as long as they are of a good enough quality there shouldn't be a problem.
Are they going on a wooden floor cos I would think dragging it across a carpet would be a much different matter?
 
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sa80mark

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2 Oct 2007
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Leicester
Just to ecco whats already been said really, yes you could use heavy duty castors but a lot depends on the cabinet construction, as long as the castors catch the upright sides or the unit you should be fine my biggest concern would be how level the floor is as trying to level your tank on a unit with castors could be a real nightmare but as I say to my mind the most important thing is how the unit is built and where the castors are placed

Also out of interest what size it the tank ?

Mark
 

Henry

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I think the safest way would be to mount the castors to a frame that would support the cabinet as fully as possible.
 

nduli

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Cabinet construction is 18mm mdf. Top sits on sides which in turn sit on the base all round so load is shared across back and sides and then transferred through the base equally. there is a small amount through a smaller post at the front.

Tank will be 75 by 45 by 45 in optiwhite so weight will be between 170kg and 200kg.
Flooring is carpet on concrete.

Sounds like its a potential goer.
 

Reuben

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17 Feb 2013
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Cabinet construction is 18mm mdf. Top sits on sides which in turn sit on the base all round so load is shared across back and sides and then transferred through the base equally.
In this case Henry's idea-
I think the safest way would be to mount the castors to a frame that would support the cabinet as fully as possible.
- is a good one.
 

Henry

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Henry

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Unless there is framework in place to spread the load, wouldn't the areas between the castors be under stress?
 

Andy Thurston

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16 Apr 2013
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if your rolling on carpet you need the biggest castors as possible to make moving easier. you can reduce cost by using ones that don't swivel if you just want to pull it forward for rear access. I'd put it on a frame too. Also don't forget that its top heavy so they need to be as close to edge as possible for stability. and as oldbloke says buy good quality castors, don't buy from places like screwfix machine mart or rs and expect to pay at least £15 per castor.
 

Reuben

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17 Feb 2013
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I understand what you are saying but am I missing something. Given the load is placed evenly across the base why not mount 100mm castors each capable of 80kg directly to the base?

Cabinet construction is 18mm mdf. Top sits on sides which in turn sit on the base all round so load is shared across back and sides and then transferred through the base equally. there is a small amount through a smaller post at the front.

The reason is because MDF does not have good resistance to sagging/warping. It is fine when it is braced correctly and the load is transferred properly. The design you describe is meant to use the bottom panel to 'spread' the load across the base, by having the base directly supported - on a floor. Although the MDF will likely have a veneer applied -usually some sort of lamitate- it does not provide much resistance to warping (rigidity). Plywood is better because of the cross direction in wood grain and glue lines between the plys, but even with plywood a supporting frame in timber would usually be used to add rigidity.

All you need do is get a length of timber that is say 30mm x50mm in section and make a nailed frame the same size as the cabinet base. You should put a couple of cross pieces in the centre of the frame too. Then screw through cabinet base into the frame to join them together. The castors can be fixed (screwed)into the frame too. Just make sure you position the wood so that the widest dimension (50mm in this example) is between the floor and base - just like the way a roof beam is orientated, so the wide section take the loading.

If that sounds a faff you could just measure the cabinet base and call into a joiner's workshop, as it would only take 10 mins to make this using machinery.

Hope this is of some help.
Reuben
 

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