• You are viewing the forum as a Guest, please login (you can use your Facebook, Twitter, Google or Microsoft account to login) or register using this link: Log in or Sign Up
  • You can now follow UKAPS on Instagram.

When to use co2

Joined
4 Jan 2021
Messages
47
Location
Gravesend
My 240l fairly heavily planted tank is going wild. Everything is growing well and in need of trimming. It’s a low light setup (well I think so anyway) and even my rotala orange juice is growing and has the orange tops. At what point would co2 injection become required. Is there a sign to look for that the plants are needing extra co2. I was using flourish excel but I have ottos, shrimp and a L134 and although I supplement their diet with courgett, I need some algae in the tank.
 

dw1305

Expert
UKAPS Team
Joined
7 Apr 2008
Messages
11,844
Location
nr Bath
Hi all,

My 240l fairly heavily planted tank is going wild. Everything is growing well and in need of trimming.
At what point would co2 injection become required.
It wouldn't be. Just keep things how they are and carry on watching the plants, all the time they (and you) are happy just keep things the same. If plant growth slows add a bit more fertiliser.

You could increase growth rate by adding more light, CO2 and mineral nutrients, but you don't need to and there really isn't any advantage.

cheers Darrel
 

Fish are friends

Member
Thread starter
Joined
4 Jan 2021
Messages
47
Location
Gravesend
I can’t keep up with the growth at the moment. Admittedly it’s fairly easy to grow plants but even the Fissidens Fontanas is showing signs of growth and it is on A shrimp tunnel on the substrate.
 

dw1305

Expert
UKAPS Team
Joined
7 Apr 2008
Messages
11,844
Location
nr Bath
Hi all,
I can’t keep up with the growth at the moment
That is why I've mainly gone away from stems, other than <"Ceratopteris thalictroides and Ceratophyllum demersum">.
I know they aren't exactly what you are after, but long term a planting based on Moss, Ferns (Bolbitis heudelotii & Microsorum pteropus), Cryptocoryne spp. and Anubias barteri cuts down a lot of the day to day maintenance.
I like plants that grow fairly slowly (Cryptocoryne spp. Anubias, Ferns, Mosses) and then I just have a floating plant (non-CO2 limited) as both my <"canary"> and as a <"safety net">, just in case of a dead fish etc.

cheers Darrel
 

X3NiTH

Member
Joined
13 Apr 2014
Messages
1,165
I need some algae in the tank.

I wouldn’t upset the positive equilibrium you have going in the tank but if you really need more of that type of flora for the grazers why not put a few rocks in a shallow bucket under strong light (outdoors or sunny windowsill) and dose the heck out of it (hydroponic strength ferts not unreasonable here depending on the rock porosity) to get them covered and periodically swap them in and out the tank to get ‘cleaned’.

:)
 

Fish are friends

Member
Thread starter
Joined
4 Jan 2021
Messages
47
Location
Gravesend
I am sure there are more than a few of us who would like to see a photo of your tank?
D71E7340-FC01-4644-AF8F-898FF527751E.jpeg
 

Wookii

Member
Joined
13 Nov 2019
Messages
1,739
Location
Nottingham
To be honest, if you are happy with your tank, and are happy with the plants in terms of growth form and density, then there is no requirement to go down the CO2 rabbit hole - just kick back, relax, and enjoy it! The well worn phrase applies . . "if it ain't broke, don't fix it"!
 

roadmaster

Member
Joined
18 Oct 2009
Messages
1,447
Location
United States
I think the oto's and pleco will find plenty to eat between rasping on biofilm on back glass,rocks,wood, and your inclusion of vegetable matter.
I suspect the Sword plant's to maybe be munched on by the pleco, and the sword plant's really need a deeper substrate to do well over the long term in my experiences with them.
I like your tank as is, but I am partial to low tech/low maint myself.
 
Last edited:

Fish are friends

Member
Thread starter
Joined
4 Jan 2021
Messages
47
Location
Gravesend
I think the oto's and pleco will find plenty to eat between rasping on biofilm on back glass,rocks,wood, and your inclusion of vegetable matter.
I suspect the Sword plant's to maybe be munched on by the pleco, and the sword plant's really need a deeper substrate to do well over the long term in my experiences with them.
I like your tank as is, but I am partial to low tech/low maint myself.
The substrate is quite deep the pic is very misleading the plinth on the front comes up about 3inches so at the back it’s about 4 inches deep. It’s very low maintenance I do a 30% water change every 2 weeks and give it a basic gravel clean and just top up when needed. I am in need of trimming but I’m inclined to just leave it to all grow a bit wil.
 

Similar threads

Top