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What PPM does this add?

Kezzab

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Apologies, I know this has been done million times I'm sure...

What PPM of N, P and K does 10ml of TNC Complete add to 200l of water?

I've tried to work it out, but I'm ending up with something suggesting I should be adding 260ml it TNC a week to achieve 20ppm, so I assume I'm going wrong somewhere.

I looked at the fert calculator too, but just started whimpering.
 

Geoffrey Rea

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Kezzab

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Thanks @Geoffrey Rea that actually tells me the sums ive done were right... So EI dosing of TNC Complete would be 266ml a week! That's 10+ times the standard dose and even 4 times the triple dose TNC describe as EI equivalent.

Am I getting something wrong here?

I'm belatedly trying to get a handle on what I am actually dosing, rather than just following the bottle or sloshing a bit in.
 

Zeus.

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So EI dosing of TNC Complete would be 266ml a week! That's 10+ times the standard dose and even 4 times the triple dose TNC describe as EI equivalent.
When you use rotala for TNC to get to reach an EI dose, it gives you the dose so it matches the Fe dose of EI thats all. All the other nutrients are just the result of dosing TNC at a dose to reach 0.5ppm Fe.
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Even at x6.25 STD TNC dose levels, TNC will be higher in NO3 than EI dosing and lower in Mg, Ca and dKH.
The weekly cost for my 500l would be £5+
Depending on you tank size a DIY clone my well be worth the effort or dose Full EI or Clives dose ;)
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Kezzab

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You definitely have to dose a lot of tnc complete to get to proper EI levels, from memory something silly like "double the tripple dose daily". Also note that says N and not NO3.
Trying and failing to fully get head round N v NO3 thing. I half get it, but I'm struggling to close the loop.

So explain the significance of it saying N, not NO3 and how that relates to me understanding what PPM NPK I am adding to my tank.?

(Via the search I've discovered I asked practically the same question 3 years ago... does not bode well.)

Thanks for patience!
 

Zeus.

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Well its the [N] thats counts no mater what form it comes in, so the amount of N you get varies depending if you use NO3 or NH4 as a salt. As a percentage of its mass NH4 has more N than NO3 as O has a higher atomic mass than H. Some folk quote [N] others use [NO3] but both are inter changeable
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The [NO3] is just over four times the [N] as a rule of 'thumb'

The way the plants use the NO3 or the NH4 is another question, NO3 salts are safe for livestock, NH4/urea carries a risk you may kill your livestock if you overdose.
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
Trying and failing to fully get head round N v NO3 thing. I half get it, but I'm struggling to close the loop.
The [NO3] is just over four times the [N] as a rule of 'thumb'
I use "4" as well, but it is easy enough to work out accurately, nitrogen is 100% N, but nitrate (NO3) also has three oxygen atoms as well.

To work out the percentage nitrogen we need to divide the RAM of N (14), by the RMM of NO3 , which is 14 + (3 * 16) = 62 and 22.7% N. So one ppm of nitrogen (N) is equivalent to (1 / 0.227) = 4.43 ppm of NO3.

You can use the same arrangement for any nitrogen containing compound, Urea (CO(NH₂)₂) has an RMM of 60 and has two nitrogen (N) atoms, and N has an RAM of 14. Twenty-eight divided by sixty makes urea 47% N. Nitrate (NO3) has an RMM of 62, one N atom and is 22.7% N.

So one gram of urea is equivalent to approximately half gram of nitrogen or two grams of nitrate.

cheers Darrel
 

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