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What other hobby's do you have?

NotoriousENG

Member
Joined
17 Jul 2021
Messages
87
Location
Eastern USA
I cant stand brussels they are so bitter! Maybe as i get older i might like them as everyone i know that likes brussels is of a certain age, i always cook my foraged chestnuts in a dry cast iron skillet in the oven.

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I love Brussel sprouts, but only if they are cooked right. My favorite recipes is to half them then toss in olive oil, Chilli powder, curry powder, thyme, onion powder, garlic, pepper, and any other spices that strike my fancy.

Then bake on a roasting sheet at 425 F till they are soft and the outer leaves start to blacken.

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foxfish

Member
Joined
11 Oct 2009
Messages
4,902
Location
Guernsey
With chestnuts, you need to place one cut across the shell but not into the meat and then soak them in salted water for two hours prier to roasting them. I use a Stanley knife to cut the shell.
I have a perferated pan that goes over a flame to roast and toss the soaked nuts for around 7-8 minutes.
If done that way you can release the nut in one piece from the shell and the meat will be tender on the inside.

Brussels, I part boil for two minutes and then roast or place on a hot plate, I find that by browning (burning) the outer leaves the vegetable takes on a new dimension and flavour.
 

zozo

Member
Joined
16 Apr 2015
Messages
8,094
Location
Netherlands
With chestnuts, you need to place one cut across the shell but not into the meat and then soak them in salted water for two hours prier to roasting them. I use a Stanley knife to cut the shell.
I have a perferated pan that goes over a flame to roast and toss the soaked nuts for around 7-8 minutes.
If done that way you can release the nut in one piece from the shell and the meat will be tender on the inside.

Thnx!! :p

I find that by browning (burning) the outer leaves the vegetable takes on a new dimension and flavour.

It's Caramelization, it brings out the sugars... Same as it makes the unions sweet... Darn, I know the process and what it does... Use it almost daily, but i really seem to have Brussels PTSS. You should have seen my mother's plates when she cooked them as if it was an Army ration... :oops:
:nurse:
 

Angus

Member
Joined
29 Aug 2008
Messages
620
Location
Vauxhall, London.
With chestnuts, you need to place one cut across the shell but not into the meat and then soak them in salted water for two hours prier to roasting them. I use a Stanley knife to cut the shell.
I have a perferated pan that goes over a flame to roast and toss the soaked nuts for around 7-8 minutes.
If done that way you can release the nut in one piece from the shell and the meat will be tender on the inside.

Brussels, I part boil for two minutes and then roast or place on a hot plate, I find that by browning (burning) the outer leaves the vegetable takes on a new dimension and flavour.
Ill have to try it ive always just roasted them without soakin they are kind of chewy like mochi when you do them like that, i imagine soaking gives a better texture?

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foxfish

Member
Joined
11 Oct 2009
Messages
4,902
Location
Guernsey
I agree, it is still common practice to encourage children to eat veg with promises or threats and will probably always be the same!
When I grew up at home as a child, my mum kept a large vegetable patch and my dad was a fisherman so we ate a lot of fish and veg but little meat.
When we did eat meat it was usually on a Sunday and would be beef, however the beef would come from a mature dairy cow (Guernsey cow) because at that time it was the cheapest meat!
As the island had huge herds of dairy cows and thier active service life was around 6-8 years, there was a lot of cheap beef to be had!

Now mature Guernsey beef is just about the most expensive meat you can buy because old dairy cows are not deemed fit to eat and are incinerated after death.
So a few enterprising folk keep the Guernsey breed bulls purely for meat but they must be at least three years old to develop the desired flavour.
Looking after a beef cow for three years is not cheap on a small island with little open space left.
However on the plus side we can now get beautiful organic mature Guernsey beef in a few select restaurants, the only issue is I have to save for 6 months to afford it !
79DCB415-BD67-4FA9-B902-5D749E7B9446.jpeg
 
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zozo

Member
Joined
16 Apr 2015
Messages
8,094
Location
Netherlands
A good piece of beef is great... And there are quite a lot of good priced but still underrated cuts... Which actually is a good thing it keeps it somewhat affordable. Such as the Bavette/Skirt if grilled correctly is a beautifully good tasting steak. Or the Flat Iron, Picanha/Rump Cap, Tri-Tip and Brisket and a few more are highly underrated but still affordable cuts. I guess it's because the restaurants don't usually serve this. They are all into the premium cuts such as the Prime Rib, Rib Eye, T-Bone and sirloin or the most overrated most expensive and least tasty of all steaks but most love me tender Filet Mignon.

If you take a Dry Brined Skirt, filet and roulade it filled with Cimichuri then spit-roasted on the BBQ till about 50°C core temp is finger-licking good.
 

pat1cp

Member
Joined
6 Oct 2021
Messages
25
Location
Ballater, Aberdeenshire
A good piece of beef is great... And there are quite a lot of good priced but still underrated cuts... Which actually is a good thing it keeps it somewhat affordable. Such as the Bavette/Skirt if grilled correctly is a beautifully good tasting steak. Or the Flat Iron, Picanha/Rump Cap, Tri-Tip and Brisket and a few more are highly underrated but still affordable cuts. I guess it's because the restaurants don't usually serve this. They are all into the premium cuts such as the Prime Rib, Rib Eye, T-Bone and sirloin or the most overrated most expensive and least tasty of all steaks but most love me tender Filet Mignon.

If you take a Dry Brined Skirt, filet and roulade it filled with Cimichuri then spit-roasted on the BBQ till about 50°C core temp is finger-licking good.
Slow cooked cheeks are my favourite. Top notch. In the UK at least, these "less prime" cuts are becoming more popular, or so my butcher tells me anyway. Probably so he can charge me more.
 

zozo

Member
Joined
16 Apr 2015
Messages
8,094
Location
Netherlands
Slow cooked cheeks are my favourite. Top notch. In the UK at least, these "less prime" cuts are becoming more popular, or so my butcher tells me anyway. Probably so he can charge me more.

That's a good one! Never heard of it... It kinda reminds me of the "Rabo Del Toro" I once ordered when I was on holiday in Madrid. That was the other end also slow-cooked and a great dish. The Bulls Tail... :p
 

dw1305

Expert
UKAPS Team
Joined
7 Apr 2008
Messages
12,686
Location
nr Bath
Hi all,
these "less prime" cuts are becoming more popular, or so my butcher tells me anyway. Probably so he can charge me more.
I've never had much money, so (along with offal and ex-laying chickens) my "go to" cheap cuts of meat were always "Belly Pork", "Neck of Lamb" (usually the scrag end) and "Beef Shin", all cheap, all really good cooked the right way (roasted in a hot oven, curried slowly and braised very slowly respectively).

Alas none of them any longer really cheap cuts and "neck of lamb" you only ever see as "fillet of neck" and then for plenty of money.

cheers Darrel
 
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pat1cp

Member
Joined
6 Oct 2021
Messages
25
Location
Ballater, Aberdeenshire
Hi all,

I've never had much money so (along with offal and ex-laying chickens) my "go to" cheap cuts of meat were always "Belly Pork", "Neck of Lamb" (usually the scrag end) and "Beef Shin", all cheap, all really good cooked the right way (roasted in a hot oven, curried slowly and braised very slowly respectively).

Alas none of them any longer really cheap cuts and "neck of lamb" you only ever see as "fillet of neck" and then for plenty of money.

cheers Darrel
Belly pork is fantastic on the BBQ. Unfortunately not so fantastic for the cholesterol. The missus let's me have it once a month 😬
 

zozo

Member
Joined
16 Apr 2015
Messages
8,094
Location
Netherlands
Pork Cheek, but then you need the one from Italy "Guanciale"... Marinated with a collection of herbs usually lots of pepper "Al Pepe". Then it's brined in salt for about 2 weeks, then washed in wine, covered with pepper again and then air-dried till only 30% of its weight remains, this can take weeks to months. This is impossible in our western climate because of the constant high air humidity.

And then make a Spaghetti carbonara or the Bucatini ala matriciana... That's the godliest piece of pork for me.

Lately, I found an Italian charcuterie on eBay selling it for a reasonable price with reasonable shipping cost... But nowadays it seems to be reasonable is a reason to be punished. Yesterday I wanted to order myself a Kilo again and at checkout, I got the message "This shop can't take orders at the moment because of tax issue reasons" :mad:
 

Angus

Member
Joined
29 Aug 2008
Messages
620
Location
Vauxhall, London.
I don't eat much red meat really i'm more of a seafood type of guy... garlic butter and lemon juice on whitefish, toro tuna sashimi, or just plain vinegar and cockles, i love that stuff.
 

zozo

Member
Joined
16 Apr 2015
Messages
8,094
Location
Netherlands
I don't eat much red meat really i'm more of a seafood type of guy... garlic butter and lemon juice on whitefish, toro tuna sashimi, or just plain vinegar and cockles, i love that stuff.

Mussels a la escargot! Delicious! No idea where the escargot came in, but it was grilled with cheese on top... Loved it! And it had loads of garlic and lemon,
 
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NotoriousENG

Member
Joined
17 Jul 2021
Messages
87
Location
Eastern USA
Beef heart is another cut that used to be cheap and is now priced at a premium, atleast in the US. Unfortunate since beef heart is important for an old family recipe: heart and potatoe dumplings.

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Joined
30 Aug 2020
Messages
354
Location
Bristol
Ill have to try it ive always just roasted them without soakin they are kind of chewy like mochi when you do them like that, i imagine soaking gives a better texture?

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Same, we used to balance them on the front of the open fire grate, they were done when the shell popped open and started to scorch. if done right, they would then easily be shelled, by closing your hand round them, swiftly, as they were hot from the fire.
 
Joined
28 Dec 2020
Messages
54
Location
Basingstoke, UKw
I love Brussel sprouts, but only if they are cooked right. My favorite recipes is to half them then toss in olive oil, Chilli powder, curry powder, thyme, onion powder, garlic, pepper, and any other spices that strike my fancy.

Then bake on a roasting sheet at 425 F till they are soft and the outer leaves start to blacken.

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This sounds amazing. Think I'm going to have to try it.

My favourite is to par boil them, cut in half and throw in a pan with seasoning, butter, a dash of olive oil, garlic and chestnuts. I then throw in some brandy at the end and flambé away (not perhaps the best method of cooking if you've had a few glasses of prosecco along the way...)
 
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