The Great Outdoors

Discussion in 'Photography' started by Tim Harrison, 28 Apr 2018.

  1. Tim Harrison

    Tim Harrison Global Moderator Staff Member

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    Somewhere in Devon...

    [​IMG]
     
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  2. Edvet

    Edvet Forum Moderator Staff Member

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    At first sight it looked like long strands of dying seaweed to me:oops:
     
  3. Tim Harrison

    Tim Harrison Global Moderator Staff Member

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    Not sure what species it is but it's little clumps growing in crevices.
     
  4. dw1305

    dw1305 Expert

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    Hi all,
    Batham looking east towards Thurlestone?
    The green algae is Ulva lactuca ("Sea Lettuce"), and the Brown seaweed (in the near ground) is Fucus spiralis ("Twisted Wrack").

    I think the grooves in the rock (Old Red Sandstone) are "ripple marks" from when the rock was laid down ~400,000,000 years ago.

    cheers Darrel
     
  5. AnhBui

    AnhBui Member

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    Just wondering why everyone calling it Bluebells while it’s purple
     
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  6. zozo

    zozo Member

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    I guess it's an old folk name from a region where they are dominantly blue. But you might also find them in white even but rather seldom in pink.. In hour language in it simply called the Wild Hyacint or the Forest Hyacint, but also mainly found and dissplayed in the color blue. I also have a plant named after it's color the Nymphaea Burgundy Princess, literaly dark red waterlily but hence it flowered twice this year and both times in White with a pink hue.

    I also wondered what's burgundy about a white version and or why would it actualy grow white flowers at all if it's named and nursed and distributed for its particular color?.

    I think not so long ago @dw1305 posted the clue in another thread that might be related, it's the Anthocyanin in the plants leaves and the recieved light intencity that determine color changes from red to blue to yellow and all intermediate colors in between. Purple is such an intermediate color mix from red and blue.. The color of anthocyanin pigment seems to be <Ph related>
    Than very likely soil acidity or alkalinity will also have effect on the flowers color development and that a Bluebelss flower tends to color more purple on a slight acidic soil and more blue on nutral or maybe alkaline soils. :) But it still is a Bluebell..

    My Burgundy red lily has developed white flowers and since some anthocyanines pigments degrade in higher pH the only clue i have why it turned white, is the pH in grows in is 8.5.
     
    Last edited: 6 Jun 2018
  7. Tim Harrison

    Tim Harrison Global Moderator Staff Member

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    Clumber Park Nottinghamshire Monday...

    [​IMG]
     
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  8. Oldguy

    Oldguy Member

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    Appears that way with hydrangeas. In our garden, plants sometimes change colour. We have white bluebells in some parts of the garden and blue in other parts and to the announce of the wife some of her white flowers in her white garden have gone pink. The latter are not self seeders but original plants. All makes for an interesting life.
     
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