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South American 400l

Conort2

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I’m sure someone else on here got the darters around the same time, can’t remember who. Would be good to see how they’re getting on.
 

Wookii

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I think I lost a couple unfortunately. I haven’t seen any bodies but haven’t seen all six together for a while now. I probably shouldn’t have added any tank mates in with them as they compete poorly for food. However the remaining darters seem healthy so maybe that wasn’t the reason. Some were rather skinny so may have been parasites.

Sorry to hear that. I guess it’s always going to be a risk with the more delicate sensitive species.

they’re doing great, no they’re in a smaller tank in the cabinet. I would love to have them in the 1500 but I think the biotodoma would make a meal of them.

Great! Would love to see some pics when you have chance. How closely do they shoal up, and how active are they (compared to, say, your typical Embers which tend to hang in a favoured spot until food shows up)?
 

Conort2

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Great! Would love to see some pics when you have chance. How closely do they shoal up, and how active are they (compared to, say, your typical Embers which tend to hang in a favoured spot until food shows up)?
They have their own little spots which they defend quite fiercely however they’ll often whizz around the tank together, they’re a great species.
 

Conort2

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Hope you’re all good?

Mum is still going strong with the fry she has left, they’ve put on some size and are clever enough to hide now when they see danger coming. I’m getting hopeful a couple might make it now.

With the fry I’ve moved into a seperate tank, I’ve seen one swimming around once. But the tank is full to the brim with moss so I’m hoping they’re just staying well hidden.

Cheers

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Conort2

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Hi,

Hope everyone’s good? Not much to report. mum and the fry are still doing well, she leaves them for long periods now and they have the sense to hide in the moss so I’m hopeful I’ll have a couple of survivors at least.

Thought I’d share a few pictures of this beast, it’s a male corydoras robustus. Strange behaviour for a corydoras, Hides all day and only comes out for food sometimes or when the tank is in complete darkness. Has to be the one of the biggest corys I’ve seen. Probably only beaten by a couple of brochis species. As an idea of the size, those are fairly sizeable female c121 and duplicareus next to him and they look tiny.

Oh and as you can see BBA has come back in quite a major way! The microsorum on the wood has exploded and is restricting the flow and subsequently where CO2 is reaching in the tank. I can feel a rescape coming on soon with more wood and less plants. I have some large pieces of river wood on order and some small pieces soaking already.

Cheers
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Conort2

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When I found out the dimensions of this scapers tank I couldn’t resist! Fits almost perfectly inside the cabinet. Since I had to move the darter characins out of the main tank I haven’t had an independent breeding tank. This will give me a chance to give the apistogramma lineata another go on their own. I will also give some of the rare tetras I’ve got a go if things don’t work out with mr and mrs apisto of which there is always a chance.

Cheers
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Conort2

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Probably should have thought about this before I filled it up but does anyone know how safe this actually is? The cabinet is extremely well made but it’s made to have a tank sit on top of it rather than have an additional two in the cabinet. I already had one 50 litre and a 35 lite under there and all was ok, however this new tank is 70l. The 70 litre is replacing the 35 litre. Am I worrying too much or am I pushing my luck having this on the bottom too?

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Wookii

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Probably should have thought about this before I filled it up but does anyone know how safe this actually is? The cabinet is extremely well made but it’s made to have a tank sit on top of it rather than have an additional two in the cabinet. I already had one 50 litre and a 35 lite under there and all was ok, however this new tank is 70l. The 70 litre is replacing the 35 litre. Am I worrying too much or am I pushing my luck having this on the bottom too?

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Is the cabinet one of their steel framed units? What is underneath the panel that the tank is sitting on?

It looks like there is a foot either side of the section the tank is on, so it’s likely fine, but you could always put some pieces of wood between the floor and the base panel to sure it up - I probably would, just to be ‘belt and braces’.
 
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Conort2

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Is the cabinet one of their steel framed units? What is underneath the panel that the tank is sitting on?

It looks like there is a foot either side of the section the tank is on, so it’s likely fine, but you could always put some pieces of wood between the floor and the base panel to sure it up - I probably would, just to be ‘belt and braces’.
It’s not steel framed, it’s one of their double skinned units. That panel is floating with the feet you can see supporting it. There’s a total of 8 feet supporting the cabinet, with four in close proximity to the new tank.
 

Conort2

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This pair of apistos obviously don’t read the books! They’re supposed to be strictly carnivorous however these two love peas, nori and now spinach too. The dicrossus are also a fan of veg too. Definitely always worth giving a variety of food items a try as you’ll never know what fish might take it.

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Hufsa

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I dont have a link at hand but I read one study where they caught wild discus and analyzed the stomach contents. Fruit made up a surprisingly large portion of the diet. I think many of our fishes have a broader diet than what we traditionally think. My otos love earthworm sticks, for instance.
Lovely fish as always @Conort2 :thumbup:
 

Conort2

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Hi all,

They eat a lot of bloodworms and terrestrial insects in the wild. It would be really interesting to know what the insects were.

cheers Darrel
Some people don’t feed bloodworm due to supposed links to bloat. Do you feel this is an issue? Lots of reports on what fish feed on in the wild shows bloodworm to be a large part of their diet.

Only reason I don’t feed it as I’m allergic to it unfortunately!
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
Some people don’t feed bloodworm due to supposed links to bloat. Do you feel this is an issue? Lots of reports on what fish feed on in the wild shows bloodworm to be a large part of their diet.
It is a bit of a strange one, but I think both parts are correct. I think this dichotomy occurs because you only get commercially collectable amounts of bloodworm in <"very polluted water">, where absolutely <"huge numbers"> can occur.

If you look at a <"Biotic Index for UK freshwater">, they are the lowest scoring (most pollution tolerant) taxa. Chironomid (non-biting midges) are found in freshwater all over the world and are a preferred food item for nearly all fish. People talk about the larval head capsule causing intestinal blockages etc., but I'm not convinced this is a real issue. I've always fed my own fish live, <"ranched" Bloodworms">, but I wouldn't feed <"commercially collected bloodworms">, and particularly <"not frozen or freeze dried ones">, whether they had been irradiated or not. Another issue is that, although we can't tell the difference between species easily, there are actually a large number of different species, with different <"ecological tolerances">, lumped under "bloodworm".

......... This would be conjecture, but I visualise the microbial assemblage in a filter in the same way that I think about the <"benthic invertebrate assemblage in a stream">. In clean water (water with a lot of dissolved oxygen and a low Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD)) you have a diverse assemblage of invertebrates, including <"Mayflies (Ephemeroptera), Stoneflies (Plecoptera), Caseless Caddis (Trichoptera) etc."> with Tubificid worms (Naididae) and "Bloodworms" (Chronomidae) etc present, but as a minor component of the assemblage.

As pollution (BOD) increases dissolved oxygen levels fall and you lose the more sensitive species from the assemblage. At the same time the number of Blood worm and "Tubifex" increases. As pollution continues to increase eventually only the haemoglobin containing Blood worms and Tubifex are left, and these often <"build up to huge numbers">.

The "Tubifex and Blood-worm" scenario is the traditional view of "cycling", with Nitrobacter winogradskyi etc representing Tubifex etc. If you only ever look at sewage treatment works? You never find the Mayflies.

cheers Darrel
 

Conort2

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It is a bit of a strange one, but I think both parts are correct. I think this dichotomy occurs because you only get commercially collectable amounts of bloodworm in <"very polluted water">, where absolutely <"huge numbers"> can occur.
This is what I had heard previously. I am currently feeding frozen black mosquito larvae as it does trigger a reaction with me. However looking at your statement about commercial collection for bloodworms I’d assume black mosquito larvae would be the same if not worse considering they can survive in almost any body of water even if it is heavily polluted.

I am also unsure where the live blackworm I purchase would be collected from, are they also tolerant of polluted conditions? Most of these I purchase are not fed instantly but kept for a long period of time outside in fresh water with some dead leaves so may be less of an issue regardless.

The fish up until now have looked great and a lot have spawned so maybe I’m just over thinking things!

Cheers
 
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