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Root tabs

John q

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6 Jan 2021
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Lancashire
Chemical analysis of flourish root tabs...
Total Nitrogen (N)0.8%
0.8 % Water Soluble Nitrogen
Available Phosphate (P2O5)0.11%
Soluble Potash (K2O)0.28%
Calcium (Ca)23.3%
Magnesium (Mg)0.29%
0.06% Water Soluble Magnesium
Sulfur (S)16.5%
Boron (B)0.003%
Cobalt (Co)0.002%
Copper (Cu)0.006%
0.001% Water Soluble Copper (Cu)
Iron (Fe)3.07%
3.07% Water Soluble Iron (Fe)
Manganese (Mn)0.16%
0.16% Water Soluble Manganese (Mn)
Molybdenum (Mo)0.0005%
Zinc (Zn)0.003%
0.003% Water Soluble Zinc (Zn)
Derived from: Potassium Chloride, Calcium Sulfate, Copper Sulfate, Magnesium Chloride, Ferrous Gluconate, Cobalt Sulfate, Magnesium Sulfate, Manganese Sulfate, Boric Acid, Sodium Molybdate, Zinc Sulfate, Hydrolyzed Yeast.

You can buy cheap osmocote on ebay..


Guaranteed analysis



Nitrogen Total (N)18%
Nitrate nitrogen (N-NO3)5.9%
Ammoniacal nitrogen (N-NH4)7.7%
Urea nitrogen (Ur-N)4.4%
Phosphorus Pentoxide (P205)9%
Water soluble (P205)6.8%
Potassium Oxide (K20)10%
Water soluble (K20)10.0%
Magnesium Oxide (MgO)2.0%
Water soluble1.3%
Iron (Fe)0.30%
Chelated by EDTA0.06%
Manganese (Mn)0.04%
Boron (B)0.01%
Water soluble0.01%
Copper (Cu)0.037%
Water soluble0.023%
Molybdenum (Mo)0.015%
Water soluble0.010%
Zinc (Zn)0.011%

Are you feeling lucky... 😀
 
Last edited:

dw1305

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nr Bath
Hi all,
Chemical analysis of flourish root tabs...

Sulfur (S)16.5%

Calcium (Ca)23.3%
I would say that you couldn't make it up, well factually you could, and it looks like it is (mainly) very expensive <"Plaster of Paris">. But the real question that Seachem should answer is: "do they deter werewolves">?
You can buy cheap osmocote on ebay..
That would do, but I would use it very sparingly, the controlled release will be <"much less controlled in the tank"> and you run the risk of an ammonia dump.

cheers Darrel
 

Mattant1994

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13 Jun 2022
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Location
Canterbury Kent
Seachem Flourish are also only micronutrients. I would try an all in one tab.
Thanks for the reply John, didn't know there was a huge difference in the root tabs but it shows there definitely is lol. So basically what I have bought is just cheap crap that only sells due to the brand name??

I'll take a look at the ones you have mentioned.

Many thanks 😊
 

Mattant1994

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Hi all,

Yes, but you could put a more <"positive spin on it">, it definitely won't dump ammonia in your tank.

cheers Darrel
Yeah i was very negative there (whoops!!) I've used Seachem stuff in the past and like the brand however when it comes to plants I'm very new to it. So when purchasing an all in one root tab what are the main things I need to look for??
 

John q

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Location
Lancashire
To be honest @Mattant1994 you probably don't need to add any root tabs, you've got a decent stock of fish to provide the ammonia and providing you dose a complete fertiliser (which I believe you are) then I reckon the plants you have will be fine.

Like Darrel mentions, when you start adding root tabs there's a potential risk of getting an ammonia spike which might encourage algae, and definitely wouldn't be good for the fish.
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
I've used Seachem stuff in the past and like the brand however when it comes to plants I'm very new to it.
The problem for me <"with Seachem"> is not so much their products, but in <"the way they are described">. Fertilisers are different from everything else, there is <"no argument about aesthetics etc">.

Nutrients are <"only available as ions">, charged particles in solution and all the elements (that form those ions) have been on the <"Earth for the last 4.5 billion years">, there aren't any special Seachem potassium ions (K+) etc.
So when purchasing an all in one root tab what are the main things I need to look for??
I'm <"not a root-tab user">, but you would want a <"complete fertiliser">, ideally one with little or no ammonia (NH3) in it (so nitrogen supplied as nitrate (NO3-)), and even then I would use them very sparingly.

cheers Darrel
 
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I agree with Darrell in that you want a complete root tab, it's far easier to make your own from the powders we all use.
Purchase a small cheap tablet puncher, clinoptilolite powder and a very sparingly dose amount of npk and csm, voila. I have done this many times and tested using only a small part of a tablet under my cryptocorynes and echinodorus and they had a very positive affect.
IMG_20220620_132237.jpg
 
Last edited:

Mattant1994

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Location
Canterbury Kent
To be honest @Mattant1994 you probably don't need to add any root tabs, you've got a decent stock of fish to provide the ammonia and providing you dose a complete fertiliser (which I believe you are) then I reckon the plants you have will be fine.

Like Darrel mentions, when you start adding root tabs there's a potential risk of getting an ammonia spike which might encourage algae, and definitely wouldn't be good for the fish.
Thanks John, 😊
 

Mattant1994

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Hi all,

The problem for me <"with Seachem"> is not so much their products, but in <"the way they are described">. Fertilisers are different from everything else, there is <"no argument about aesthetics etc">.

Nutrients are <"only available as ions">, charged particles in solution and all the elements (that form those ions) have been on the <"Earth for the last 4.5 billion years">, there aren't any special Seachem potassium ions (K+) etc.

I'm <"not a root-tab user">, but you would want a <"complete fertiliser">, ideally one with little or no ammonia (NH3) in it (so nitrogen supplied as nitrate (NO3-)), and even then I would use them very sparingly.

cheers Darrel
Thanks for all your help Darryl
 

Mattant1994

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13 Jun 2022
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Location
Canterbury Kent
I agree with Darrell in that you want a complete root tab, it's far easier to make your own from the powders we all use.
Purchase a small cheap tablet puncher, clinoptilolite powder and a very sparingly dose amount of npk and csm, voila. I have done this many times and tested using only a small part of a tablet under my cryptocorynes and echinodorus and they had a very positive affect.View attachment 190194
Sou ds like a great idea, I might look into it. Tha ks for all your help
 

erwin123

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4 Mar 2021
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Singapore
There seem to be two ways to use root tabs/ osmocote
(1) 'whole tank; approach. - i.e. adding X number of root tabs per square inch in order to 'cover' the entire tank
(2) 'target plants' approach - adding a much small number of root tabs under specific plants in order to help them grow better.

I use method (2)..

I have plants that grow like weeds without adding osmocote (which suggests they are perfectly happy with whats in the water column) so I see no reason to increase their growth rate further by adding osmocote for those plants. Instead, I add osmocote to 'help' selected plants . Since I am using far smaller amount of osmocote , ammonia leakage (if any), is less of an issue.
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
Great wee idea wrapping in clay.
I always take the (<"cheapest">) path of <"least resistance">.
Very very slow release then I'd assume?
No real way of knowing I'm afraid. Some nutrients would have been <"held by the CEC"> (and / or AEC) of the substrate, but monovalent ions (like K+, NH4+, NO3- etc.) are very lightly bound and would find their way into the water column fairly quickly.

I've gone down an alternative path since, where I basically try and keep the substrate undisturbed and hope <"that ecological processes"> will, over time, make nutrients available.

cheers Darrel
 
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