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Please help - algae infestation

Ds_BerSerK

Member
Joined
27 Jan 2022
Messages
31
Location
Malta
This setup has been running for the last 4 months, all of a sudden I get these algae and in a couple of days, it's got worse. I'm not sure if this is green hair algae. Can someone id this for me and provide some tips on what could be causing it, thanks?

I haven't changed much in terms of the aquarium itself, the only thing is that I've started adding fish. I do a water change every week or 1 week and a half. I'm still fighting BGA but has recently started to get better.

Please help, thanks.
 

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jaypeecee

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Joined
21 Jan 2015
Messages
2,672
Location
Bracknell
Hi @Ds_BerSerK

I'm as sure as I can be that it's Staghorn algae, which belongs to the Red Algae family.

I haven't changed much in terms of the aquarium itself, the only thing is that I've started adding fish.

...and this is possibly when the algae was introduced into your tank. All it takes is one tiny fragment bagged up with your fish and this is then added to your tank. I suggest you do a search for 'staghorn' here on UKAPS. You will find plenty of references to this algae and, perhaps, some suggestions on how to get rid of it.

You could also take a look at the following, which is quite helpful:


Please keep us updated.

JPC
 

MichaelJ

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Joined
9 Feb 2021
Messages
1,690
Location
Minnesota, USA
Hi @Ds_BerSerK please post more information about your tank. I agree with @jaypeecee - it sure looks like Staghorn to me as well - likely introduced with LFS water/plants.


Cheers,
Michael
 

Ds_BerSerK

Member
Thread starter
Joined
27 Jan 2022
Messages
31
Location
Malta
My aquarium is 120cm x 50cm x 60cm around 350litres, temp is 25c.

I have the following fish;
35 Cardinal Tetras
10 Rummy Nose
8 Otocinlus
1 Killifish
5 Leopard Corys
2 Zebra Loaches, hoping to get 4/5 more
10 Amano Shrimps
6 Glass Catfish
1 Dwarf Clawed Frog

It's quite heavily planted and I have C02, around 1 bubble per second with around 7 hours of light set to medium-high.

Yesterday I've tested my water
PH - 7
NH4 - 0.05
NO2 - 0.025
NO3 - 1
According to the JBL test kit that I use all parameters are within the norm.

I have had quite a bit of BGA but slowly slowly it seems to be under control even though I'm still getting a bit. Will do a treatment with Easylife BlueExit on my next water change, which should hopefully be today.

It definitely is Staghorn algae it mostly grew on plants but I have one single rock which has it at the top as well.

After reading this article and the ones you provided, I will try Seachem Excel Flourish which will increase CO2 as well. Maybe throw in a some Siamese algae eaters.

Thanks again for the help.
 

Wookii

Member
Joined
13 Nov 2019
Messages
3,139
Location
Nottingham
As @MichaelJ suggested, it helps no end if you list the set-up details given in the guidance article Michael linked to. Namely:

1. Size of tank in litres.
2. Age of the set - up.
3. Filtration.
4. Lighting and duration.
5. Substrate.
6. Co2 dosing or Non-dosing.
7. Fertilizers used & Ratios.
8. Water change regime and type.
9. Plant list + When planted.
10. Inhabitants.
11. Full tank shot & Surface Image.

If I'm going to take a wild guess based on the limited information you have provided, your issues are a) too much light, b) no or too little fertiliser, and c) too little CO2 . . . I wouldn't bother with the Excel treatment until you've got the other three factors sorted.

Turn the lights down, or add a load of floating plants to cut the light.

Increase CO2 levels and distribution until you get a green drop checker in all areas of the aquarium - Guide here: CO2 Measurement Using A Drop Checker

Start dosing a comprehensive all in one fertilizer.

If you are getting BGA, it suggests a lack of dissolved oxygen. Fixing the CO2 and the ferts will help as your plants start photosynthesizing more, but you should increase surface agitation also.
 

Ds_BerSerK

Member
Thread starter
Joined
27 Jan 2022
Messages
31
Location
Malta
As @MichaelJ suggested, it helps no end if you list the set-up details given in the guidance article Michael linked to. Namely:



If I'm going to take a wild guess based on the limited information you have provided, your issues are a) too much light, b) no or too little fertiliser, and c) too little CO2 . . . I wouldn't bother with the Excel treatment until you've got the other three factors sorted.

Turn the lights down, or add a load of floating plants to cut the light.

Increase CO2 levels and distribution until you get a green drop checker in all areas of the aquarium - Guide here: CO2 Measurement Using A Drop Checker

Start dosing a comprehensive all in one fertilizer.

If you are getting BGA, it suggests a lack of dissolved oxygen. Fixing the CO2 and the ferts will help as your plants start photosynthesizing more, but you should increase surface agitation also.
What all in one fertilizer would you recommend? I have the Tropica Specialised Nutrition, which I've used before in another aquarium but not in this one yet.

I'll try to add more details about my setup later or tomorrow when I'm back home.
 

Wookii

Member
Joined
13 Nov 2019
Messages
3,139
Location
Nottingham
What all in one fertilizer would you recommend? I have the Tropica Specialised Nutrition, which I've used before in another aquarium but not in this one yet.

I'll try to add more details about my setup later or tomorrow when I'm back home.

TSN is fine, but on a 350 litre tank you'll chew through it fast which proves expensive. You'd be far better mixing dry ferts yourself: The Estimative Index (EI) Dosing with Dry Salts

If you prefer to buy an off the shelf mix - and I'm not sure what is available in Malta - look out for something like APT EI.

The source of your algae problems is deteriorating plant health due to lack of nutrients (including CO2), and high lighting which is driving the demand for those nutrients even further. Achieve active healthy plant growth, and you'll gradually inhibit the algal growth. At that point you can then look to deal with any algae that remains.

Along with the ferts and CO2 corrections, in the short term you can try and manually remove as much of the staghorn as you can, and increase the water changes.
 

jaypeecee

Member
Joined
21 Jan 2015
Messages
2,672
Location
Bracknell
Hi @Ds_BerSerK

I have had quite a bit of BGA but slowly slowly it seems to be under control even though I'm still getting a bit. Will do a treatment with Easylife BlueExit on my next water change, which should hopefully be today.

You may (or may not!) find something of interest in the following thread:


JPC
 

sparkyweasel

Member
Joined
30 Jun 2011
Messages
2,422
I would also* increase the water changes. You have recently gone from no fish to a lot of fish; you also have ammonia and nitrite showing on your tests. There will probably be other organic wastes that we cannot easily test for. Organic waste often contributes to algae problems and can be detrimental to fish health.

*In addition to following the excellent advice already given.
 

Ds_BerSerK

Member
Thread starter
Joined
27 Jan 2022
Messages
31
Location
Malta
TSN is fine, but on a 350 litre tank you'll chew through it fast which proves expensive. You'd be far better mixing dry ferts yourself: The Estimative Index (EI) Dosing with Dry Salts

If you prefer to buy an off the shelf mix - and I'm not sure what is available in Malta - look out for something like APT EI.

The source of your algae problems is deteriorating plant health due to lack of nutrients (including CO2), and high lighting which is driving the demand for those nutrients even further. Achieve active healthy plant growth, and you'll gradually inhibit the algal growth. At that point you can then look to deal with any algae that remains.

Along with the ferts and CO2 corrections, in the short term you can try and manually remove as much of the staghorn as you can, and increase the water changes.
I'd rather go for something off the shelf and APT EL is available for shipping to Malta, I'll give it a try.

I've tried removing it but it's attached to the plant so hard that I've considered trimming those that have it, though I don't want to create an imbalance due to much trimming.

I'll also increase water changes.
 
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