Plant ID

Discussion in 'Plant Help' started by chris80, 8 Sep 2015.

  1. chris80

    chris80 Newly Registered

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  2. Mick.Dk

    Mick.Dk Member

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    Dk
    Impossible to ID this with anything even close to certainty, sorry.
    It does defenitely not resemble any types of Ludwigia repens, I know of........
    - and to my knowledge, L. repens and L. ovalis are different species.

    It might be possible to get a better idea of ID, if you try again later when (if) the plant has adapted to submerse growth.
     
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  3. Nelson

    Nelson Member

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    dw1305 likes this.
  4. Edvet

    Edvet Forum Moderator Staff Member

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    Agreed looks like a sword plant of some sort.
     
  5. Mick.Dk

    Mick.Dk Member

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    Echinodorus (=sword plants) usually don't have the veins in the leaf-plate arranged in this way......especially not the ones with "not-so-round" leaves.
    But Echonodorus is a possibility.
    It's really difficult for me to see, if it's a bit of stem, at the base of the plant. Leavs does not look submerse, though, so they can change a lot in process.
     
  6. zozo

    zozo Member

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  7. Mick.Dk

    Mick.Dk Member

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    Honestly........
    This picture will resemble Samolus valerandi and Gymnocoronis spilanthoides very well, too, being emerse state.......( if sold in price-category of Ludwigia, these are actually more likely.)
    It is "free guessing" and will, more likely than not, lead to possible false ID's. At which point, I really find it better NOT to cast names !!!
    - getting pic.s of submerge growth, will likely narrow possibilities down.
     
  8. zozo

    zozo Member

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    I don't get it Mick.. :) You have to start somewhere.. Where do you start if there are no names given as suggestions?
     
  9. zozo

    zozo Member

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    No names, this time.. :) But the snipping tool.. :thumbup: Pretty close (up)..

    n30sLOe.jpg
     
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  10. dw1305

    dw1305 Expert

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    Hi all,
    You would need to see the leaf veins at the junction between the leaf petiole ("stalk") and laminar ("blade") to tell whether it was an Echinodorus, but it looks like a mono-cotyledon to me (you can see 3 parallel main veins extending along the length of the top side of the leaf, in the left hand image above).

    If it is an Echinodorus the petiole laminar junction will look like "C." in the image below

    If it was Samolus, (or another di-cotyledon), it would have only the central vein extending along the entire length of the leaf, and the venation would form more of a net ("reticulate venation").

    Kerner+&+Oliver+Fig+150+Monocot+leaves+simple.jpg

    From <"http://botanyprofessor.blogspot.co.uk/2012/01/how-grass-leaf-got-its-stripes.html">

    cheers Darrel
     
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  11. Mick.Dk

    Mick.Dk Member

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    "A picture says more than a thousaind words.........(and all that Jazz....)"
    Good illustated, Darrel :thumbup:(unfortunately, I'm an illiterate with PC)
    - I really never said, you can't give suggestions....I just said, some pictures leave (too) many possibilities. And then guesses are running wild.
    I have played that game at my earlier days, leading to people (let's not use names here) to state a defenite ID of their plants. As it happens, one time my guess was actually NOT correct for the plant......but I still see "my wrong name" being used. Probaply because it made the plant more interesting, then it turned out to actually be. Or maybe because someone didn't notice, I corrected my guess (got to see both sides, eh !!)
    - point being; if ID is "too uncertain", it should not be done, since it can easily create more confusion, than actually help.
    My own first thought on this particulary one...........was actually just an emerse type of Ech. bleheri (though I couldn't enlarge pic. on this pad !!).
     
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  12. zozo

    zozo Member

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    I just wondered where your reply suddenly came from Mick. Thanks for the elaboration. :) Cause imo nobody gave a distinct id yet in this topic.. I was the only one giving a distinct name of a possible candidate found with searching the type of plant to narrow down the possibilities of determination. It looked as a rossette plant type to me after looking at the picture up close and the name i gave comes close.. It's up to Chris to hold both even closer together and see and then still you don't realy know for sure realy.

    Speaking for myself i do not even dare to give a distinct ID.. because im already lurking aquatic plant databases almost daily for the past year now and my cuckoo clock is running over time with all inconsistencies found when it comes to names of plants. What else can you do than go with the name other than provided by the supplier. Like i thought i bought some Christmas moss from a well respected moss specialist nursery to find out at UKAPS that it probably isn't. :arghh:
     

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