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Plan to boiled wood float again?

Arturosito

Member
Joined
11 Sep 2020
Messages
33
Location
Mexico
Here's the deal: I want to boil wood to prevent it from floating. But then, I want to start my tank with the dry start method. Will it float again when adding water after the dry start?
 

MichaelJ

Member
Joined
9 Feb 2021
Messages
853
Location
Minnesota, USA
Here's the deal: I want to boil wood to prevent it from floating. But then, I want to start my tank with the dry start method. Will it float again when adding water after the dry start?
Agree with @plantnoobdude

Your best bet if you want to use the wood in the scape from the get go is to hold it down with some rocks or, depending on the size and shape of the driftwood, screw it on (using quality nylon screws) a piece of plexiglas or similar, and cover the surface with a fair amount of substrate to hold down the wood - I've done that a couple of times.

Cheers,
Michael
 
Last edited:

castle

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Joined
19 Dec 2015
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762
Location
norfolk
If you soak the wood so that it is sinking/has sunk and the dry start tank is covered with something to prevent moisture escape; then I don’t think the wood will lose enough moisture in a month of being in an almost 100% humidity box.

Should be fine.
 

MichaelJ

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Joined
9 Feb 2021
Messages
853
Location
Minnesota, USA
If you soak the wood so that it is sinking/has sunk and the dry start tank is covered with something to prevent moisture escape; then I don’t think the wood will lose enough moisture in a month of being in an almost 100% humidity box.

Should be fine.
@castle , yes, if it's already saturated (or close to), I think you might be right.
 
Last edited:

zozo

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Joined
16 Apr 2015
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8,095
Location
Netherlands
Boiling driftwood is an old school practice for getting out as much as tannins as possible. But it also destroys the cells and it makes the wood decay faster. In the end, it's the very same thing as soaking it in cold water but it takes a tad longer, if you are not in a hurry then simply throw the piece in a tub with water, weigh it down and leave it in there for a few weeks or as long as needed. Also, this will flush out plenty of tannins.

Once it is sufficiently waterlogged to stay submerged it will need an extremely long time to dry and float again. And this will definitively not happen during a dry start.

Some more modern studies revealed that Tannins actually are rather beneficial and healthy for water life and you can't have enough of it. One should put it in an aquarium instead of taking it out. So why take it out and meanwhile damage and destroy a piece of wood by boiling it?
 

MichaelJ

Member
Joined
9 Feb 2021
Messages
853
Location
Minnesota, USA
Boiling driftwood is an old school practice for getting out as much as tannins as possible. But it also destroys the cells and it makes the wood decay faster. In the end, it's the very same thing as soaking it in cold water but it takes a tad longer, if you are not in a hurry then simply throw the piece in a tub with water, weigh it down and leave it in there for a few weeks or as long as needed. Also, this will flush out plenty of tannins.

Once it is sufficiently waterlogged to stay submerged it will need an extremely long time to dry and float again. And this will definitively not happen during a dry start.

Some more modern studies revealed that Tannins actually are rather beneficial and healthy for water life and you can't have enough of it. One should put it in an aquarium instead of taking it out. So why take it out and meanwhile damage and destroy a piece of wood by boiling it?

I used to be rather hysterical about my water being as neutral and clear as possible... Now, after getting shrimps in one of my tanks some months ago I started to add lots of almond leaves. I am definitely getting stained water now and am actually starting to like it. It also benefits the tetras.

Cheers,
Michael
 

J-Bonham

New Member
Joined
15 Apr 2020
Messages
12
Location
Uk
I would be more inclined to anchor the wood down. I've always found the more stable hardscape is the easier maintenance will be, if you develop and algae issues you can give the hardscape a proper scrubbing without trashing the whole scape.
 
Joined
26 Sep 2021
Messages
31
Location
Gloucester, UK
I pre soaked my wood for almost a month and then I still had to glue/weigh down with rocks. It wasn't even that big (2 pieces for a 45cm tank!)
I'd find a way to secure/anchor the wood
 

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