Nature 40

Discussion in 'Planted Tank Gallery' started by jorge_pt, 15 Feb 2018.

  1. jorge_pt

    jorge_pt Newly Registered

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    Nature 40

    Ecosystem with 40cm, extra clear glass aquarium, with invisible finishing, hang on filter and led lighting system of 10w 6500k.

    The ecosystem was created with Frodo stone, selected roots and Aquaflora aquatic plants; carpet plants (Micranthemum species 'Monte Carlo' and Eleocharis Aciculares) and low maintenance plants (Anubia nana paxing, Anubia nana pangolino, Bucephalandra motleyana Melawi, Bolbitis heteroclita difformis and Cryptocoryne parva).

    The ecosystem is inhabited by a couple of Bettas Splendens, five Corydoras Pygmaeus, ten Tetra Ember and a colony of Neocaridinas.

     
  2. Tim Harrison

    Tim Harrison Super Moderator Staff Member

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    Looking good, but how do you manage to make two Bettas compatible ?
     
  3. Franks

    Franks Member

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    Getting a mating pair?


    Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
     
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  4. Tim Harrison

    Tim Harrison Super Moderator Staff Member

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    I've never kept them but thought in most cases it was best to keep them on their own even males and females except of course when they are actually breeding.
     
  5. nel.pogorzelska

    nel.pogorzelska Member

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    I've always heard that you shouldn't keep them together longer than needed. It's great to hear it can be done! Though it seems risky.
     
  6. AverageWhiteBloke

    AverageWhiteBloke Member

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    One's a female isn't it just with quite long fins? I've always kept males and females together as long as the females have plenty of places to hide if need be. Females will also live happily together, do a bit of displaying but never get into fistcuffs. Really nice tank as well :thumbup:
     
  7. jorge_pt

    jorge_pt Newly Registered

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    Thanks in advance for the answers!

    Sorry for the delay!
    Yes, of course normally after a larger water exchange, the male shows a more aggressive behavior, but nothing that is dangerous, to date!
    I tried to create conditions to be able to keep both, having started with only 2 females, 3 weeks later I added the male and lowered the temperature of the aquarium, thus also lowering the metabolism of the fish, then went to wait, had to remove the smaller female, and now it's been almost 7 months since I got the couple with no problems, the rest of the fish I added 1 month ago.
    I do not guarantee that if you do this is going to work, luck or not with me it worked!
    :):):)

     
  8. AverageWhiteBloke

    AverageWhiteBloke Member

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    I used to breed Bettas and haven't ever had any issues keeping males with females as long as the tank is big enough and she has plenty of places to hide. Two females also takes the pressure off one I find but I've never kept them in a really small tank unless it was for breeding. I don't think these fish are as aggressive as some say, they pick up their reputation from the fighting fish which are especially aggressive but these fish are chosen for their aggression. Obviously there's nothing to say that you won't pick up an aggressive fish, it's the luck of the draw.

    The male tends to chase away the female even when she's ready for spawning until he's happy with his bubble nest. Once he's happy he'll try and entice her into it and the aggression calms down a bit. The problems generally start after spawning, the female is weakened by the whole experience and just wants to relax but at this point the male is super aggressive towards any fish. Best way to keep the peace is to break up the nest all the time, do a water change and scoop it off the surface. When he's busy nest building he's not being a nuisance.

    Strange thing is you can actually keep young males together for quite a long time as long as they were spawned and raised together in the same tank, even when they are quite are good size and fully developed with their fins. From what I hear once they are separated from each other never try and put them back together but I've never tried that. You also find out of quite a large spawning that a few of them will look like females for quite a long time. I've gave them to people as females but they turned out to be short finned and brown bodied males probably harking back to their wild form genes.
     
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  9. dw1305

    dw1305 Expert

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    Hi all,
    I've kept female and male fighters together before in very weedy tanks.
    I found the same with Apistogramma cacatuoides, you can keeps sibling males together without much problem. It was different with Apistogramma trifasciata, the males were homicidal from a very young age.

    cheers Darrel
     
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  10. AverageWhiteBloke

    AverageWhiteBloke Member

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    I wonder if it's to do with their natural habitat in the wild? From what I understand of Bettas they breed in small puddles and only separate out when it rains and they can move on to other puddles. As there is no time limit on when this could happen maybe they tolerate each other as a survival technique until they can get a puddle of their own whereas some of the Dwarf Cichlids which generally spawn in open systems want some territory straight away. Just thinking out loud :)

    You’re a Dwarf Cichlid fan Darrel, are there any other than Blue Rams and Kribs where both Males and females tend to the young? Only had experience with Apistogramma cacatuoides and Borelli, these supposedly have harems I think but I kept lone pairs and when I tried to remove the males they went on a cavalry charge eating fry.
     
  11. dw1305

    dw1305 Expert

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    Hi all,
    Not out of the species I've kept, the female has always tried to keep the male away from the fry, but the male has sometimes carried out "territorial" guarding duties.

    I've only kept harem forming species. I'm not sure with what happens with the <"pair forming species of Apistogramma"> (nijssenii group) or with the mouth brooders <"(Apistogramma barlowi"> etc).

    cheers Darrel
     
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