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My plant problem

SajjadM95

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hello everyone.

this is my little tank. (18.5 L)

about 5 days ago I planted these plants in my tank. for CO2 I use liquid carbon flourish excel when I turn the light (0.4 cc for 18 liter). I also have bought Fertilizer flourish seachem but I didn't use it yet. the first day and the third day I added bacteria liquid for stabilization system. now after 5 days in my tank the biofilm created and my plant leaves I think they got brown. is it normal? I've read that in initial days it is normal. I have just one Siamese fighting fish(betta) in my tank and I didn't add any fish yet.
 

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Considering these diatoms and white fungus and that it is not more than 5 days since the aquarium was set up, should I siphon off a third of the water and replace it with fresh water? And physically remove the pollution as much as possible? Or is it cleaned by the fish? Today, I added two Gyrinocheilus aymonieri and three crossocheilus siamensis and one killer snail to the aquarium.
Thanks.
 
Considering these diatoms and white fungus and that it is not more than 5 days since the aquarium was set up, should I siphon off a third of the water and replace it with fresh water?
Yes you need to be changing the water, especially on a new set up that's only 5 days old. You can siphon out the white fungus if it bothers you during this water change.
Today, I added two Gyrinocheilus aymonieri and three crossocheilus siamensis
Considering the tank is only 18.5L I'm going to stake my reputation and say your choice of fish isn't ideal, the above mentioned sp grow fairly large and need to be kept in a much bigger aquarium, I also wouldn't mix these types of fish together, especially not with a betta.

So to recap, you have a tank that isn't mature and overstocked with inappropriate fish.
My advice would be to do frequent water changes (daily) and seriously think about re homing the recent additions to the tank.

Tank itself looks good BTW 👍
 
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I'm going to stake my reputation and say your choice of fish isn't ideal, the above mentioned sp grow fairly large and need to be kept in a much bigger aquarium, I also wouldn't mix these types of fish together, especially not with a betta.
Great post John. Count me in on the reputation staking - 100% agree with you! 2 Chinese algae eaters and 3 Siamese algae eaters are completely inappropriate for an 18 L tank. We should never introduce livestock for the purpose of solving temporary problems or compensating for our lack of patience! The algae eaters needs to be rehoused sooner rather than later - if not already the case, they will soon outgrow the tank, be very uncomfortable and possibly starve.

Tank itself looks good BTW 👍
I agree. No issues here that time won’t fix.

Cheers,
Michael
 
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I removed the betta fish. The rest of the fish are too small to grow a little bigger, I will transfer them. Do you think it is better to use some Macrotocinclus affinis fish instead of these fish?
 
I removed the betta fish. The rest of the fish are too small to grow a little bigger, I will transfer them. Do you think it is better to use some Macrotocinclus affinis fish instead of these fish?
There’s a discussion going on elsewhere in the forum about stocking of fish for a given aquarium size.

It’s not an exact science but the three main factors are water quality, swimming space and fish compatibility.

The first is dependent on your maintenance schedule/quality and on your filtration system.

The second is dependent on the physical dimensions of your aquarium; the hardscape and decorations and the size and activity levels of your fish.

The final component depends on the type of fish you intend to keep. Are they territorial, do they live in schools, are they messy eaters, do they like your water parameters etc…

None of it is simple or easy to quantify. An 18.5l aquarium is very small which makes all of the above considerations all the more important. If you were to head to the fish section of the forum and ask for suggestions I’m sure you would get some good advice.
 
I will transfer them. Do you think it is better to use some Macrotocinclus affinis fish instead of these fish?
Hiya mate, I'm going to be honest and you probably won't like the advice.

To me a tank of this size isn't suitable for Otocinclus either and even if they were I wouldn't recommend putting them in a tank that is yet to mature. Otolincus are delicate little fish and need a well established tank before they will thrive, even then it might not be enough to keep them healthy as they are generally imported in a poor state of health, add to this the stress of being in a tiny tank, well it probably won't end well.

So to answer the question; Otocinclus would be more suitable than the fish you have but not ideal.

A better approach would be to add 2/3 Amano shrimp or depending on your water start a colony of Cherry shrimp. You could also add a few algae eating snails like Nerite sp. Ideally you'd let the tank settle for another week or so before adding these.

One last important point:
8leil4.jpg
 
Im no expert but speaking on experience and on the assumption that its your first tank, having started with a similiar size tank when I first got in to the hobby, personally I would not recommend any livestock apart from some shrimp (or a few very small nano fish if you insist on having fish). If you can, then go for the biggest litre tank you can get as it will be more enjoyable and less chance of things going wrong (especially with changes in water parameters). I had to constantly, almost daily keep up with maintenance and making sure the water was good etc., to the point it was less fun and more stress.
 
Personally, I think a tank this size is barely suitable for any livestock except perhaps some shrimps and snails. I don't know what it is about our thinking on Betta tanks in general... In nature Betta fish are found in shallow ponds, marshes, rice fields and such... not pint size beer glasses... Betta fish need swimming space as well, but they do prefer shallower waters (tanks).

@SajjadM95 , everyone here wants you to succeed with your aquarium. I would get a bigger and slightly shallower tank - 40-50 L if you want to keep it on the smaller size. With that you can keep a happy betta, some shrimps as well as some Otto's when the tank is mature.

Cheers,
Michael
 
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Hi everyone.
Thanks all of you.
I have removed Betta and one the crossocheilus siamensis and I will replace them with shrimp.
my aquarium condition looks good after two weeks of starting it. But recently, these green spot algae have appeared that are firmly attached to the glass. And there are dark brown spots on these leaves. These are not algae because they cannot be removed by touching the hand. Is it related to phosphate? I use liquid carbon and liquid fertilizer and anti-algae as shown in the picture below.
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