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Invetro plant question

RudeDogg1

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Invetro and tissue culture newb question. This is my first time buying invetro and tissue cultures. I thought they were the same thing? If they aren’t are invetro plants meant to come without roots? I ordered some off of eBay due to the normal supplies not having a few in stock I was after and they have turned up with no roots. Not much of an issue I guess because I’m going to be doin a dry start just thought it was odd
 

noodlesuk

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Effectively they are the same, in vitro and tissue culture plants, both grown in artificial medium, outside of their usual biological context I.e lab produced/farmed.

I would expect there to always be roots, unless they have been snipped off, like in the case of a stem plant, but these usually come in a rock wool with roots.What plant was it?
 

RudeDogg1

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Effectively they are the same, in vitro and tissue culture plants, both grown in artificial medium, outside of their usual biological context I.e lab produced/farmed.

I would expect there to always be roots, unless they have been snipped off, like in the case of a stem plant, but these usually come in a rock wool with roots.What plant was it?

Cuba, hm, glosso and a few stem plants
 

noodlesuk

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Hmm does seem strange, have always had roots, on all the plants I've bought. Otherwise they'd be more like cuttings.
 

noodlesuk

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That’s what I thought very strange just had a look at his listings and it does actually state some strange reason for the lack of roots “roots aren’t needed when invetro”

https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/181540510773
Ah, seems like it can happen, depending on the plant, just never seen it before on any plants I've. bought.

"Some plants might form almost no roots at all in an in vitro cup, whereas others grow like there’s no tomorrow"

from https://www.aquasabi.com/aquascaping-wiki_aquatic-plants_in-vitro-or-potted-plants

Explains it all there,
 

RudeDogg1

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dw1305

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Hi all,
they are the same, in vitro and tissue culture plants, both grown in artificial medium, outside of their usual biological context I.e lab produced/farmed.
That is it, exactly the same in vitro just means grown in artificial culture (literally "in glass"), and tissue cultured just means grown from a very small propagule. Plants have the potential to regenerate themselves from a single cell ("totipotency"), which means that your ex-plant (your cutting) can be a small cluster of cells, usually from an apical meristem.

The advantages are that you can bulk up new plants, quickly by sub-culturing the meristem as it grows, and the culture is virus free because of the small amount of meristematic tissue used initially.

Personally I would be reluctant to buy a tissue cultured plant without any roots. The company wants to sell their cultures at the youngest age possible, before they <"grow out of profit">, and maybe factoring in some further growth while the plants are waiting to be sold.

cheers Darrel
 

Tim Harrison

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Some in vitro stems and HC and MC typically don't have much in the way of roots. You end up having to bury a portion of the plant to get it to stay put. It helps if you angle them slightly in to the direction of flow. They soon develop roots and leaves.
 

RudeDogg1

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Some In vitro stems and HC and MC typically don't have much in the way of roots. You end up having to bury a portion of the plant to get it to stay put. It helps if you angle them slightly in to the direction of flow. They soon develop roots and leaves.

I will be doing a dry start so shouldn’t be much of a problem I think
 

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