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Help with co2 cylinders

Discussion in 'Carbon Dioxide (CO2)' started by Harvoification, 11 Jan 2017.

  1. Harvoification

    Harvoification Member

    Messages:
    56
    Hi everyone,

    I'm looking to purchase a 2kg co2 cylinder for my 125 litre Juwel Rio. This is mostly due to the fact that my Aqua One Nano co2 set is terrible - 95g doesn't last long and the diffuser and co2 tubing fill up with water overnight resulting in my having to take apart my kit every single morning and putting everything back together before I start injecting.

    I've been talking to a company that sell cylinders but there's some terminology that I don't quite understand in their email and I can't find a sufficient explanation with Google, so I though I'd ask the experts.


    Their email reads as follows:

    "We have supplied 2kg Co2 cylinders for use with aquariums before, we can supply a 2kg Co2 cylinder c/w a screw down valve for £48.00 plus vat (£57.60)

    The unit will be a fully tested unit and come with a test certificate which is valid for ten years. After ten years the cylinder will need testing and the valve replacing.

    Refill costs up to the ten year date are £5.00 including vat (if you bring the cylinder to us, can usually be filled whilst you wait if cylinder is in test).

    The price for the cylinder includes delivery if we can deliver when next in your area, if we need to make a special trip we would need to charge for delivery (£15.00)


    The valve will have a dip tube fitted which means that the liquid co2 is discharged as opposed to a welding cylinder where no dip tube is fitted and just the Co2 vapour is used (this is the set up for most welding applications).

    You can have either option please advise which you would prefer."


    My questions are:
    • What is a screw down valve, and do I need one?
    • Will I need a dip tube or should I got with a welding cylinder instead with no dip tube?
    I know I may sound ignorant, but I wanted to make sure I get things right the first time around. Thanks for your help.
     
  2. Iain mlaren

    Iain mlaren Member

    Messages:
    71
    Hi. I'm no expert. But I believe the screw down is like the tap to put it easily. Unscrew release gas tighten shut off gas. The dip tube I believe is so you can use the liquid co2. They use this to recharge paintball guns and other canisters. You won't need that as you want the gas. I'm no expert and I'm sure someone will put some extra information about this. Iain
     
  3. Chrispowell

    Chrispowell Member

    Messages:
    207
    Sounds expensive to me, I pay £25 for 6.3kg bottle or occasionally I go to someone local who does a 2kg FE for £10.

    Maybe post in the regional section to find the right product tried and tested closer to home?
     
  4. Iain mlaren

    Iain mlaren Member

    Messages:
    71
    What is the problem with water in your pipes? I'm guessing the inline back flow is faulty? I had this issue with about 3 of mine. I eventually got an aquaone make and never had water flow back since
     
  5. Harvoification

    Harvoification Member

    Messages:
    56
    I guess so. It states it is a three-in-one diffuser/bubble counter/check valve... but clearly the check valve can't be working if water is going up the pipe?
     
  6. Iain mlaren

    Iain mlaren Member

    Messages:
    71
    I'd get a new check valve. They only cost a couple of quid. Might save a lot of hassle and money luckily when it was doing this on my tank the pipe was long enough and never got into my regs. The one I got was an aquaone and it's been pretty good so far. Little bit on the ugly side if you like the minimal look but does the job.
     
    PARAGUAY likes this.
  7. Iain mlaren

    Iain mlaren Member

    Messages:
    71
  8. Harvoification

    Harvoification Member

    Messages:
    56
    I ordered a CO2 check valve which should hopefully be arriving tomorrow. However, it'll be positioned much higher up the tubing, out of the water, so I don't quite understand how it will stop the lower tubing from over flowing, nor the diffuser?
     
  9. Harvoification

    Harvoification Member

    Messages:
    56
  10. Iain mlaren

    Iain mlaren Member

    Messages:
    71
    They usually have like a rubber bung in them I believe as the water flows up the tube it pushes on the rubber bung causing a seal. I'm not 100% on that but I think it's correct. Co2 check valves are better as the rubber seal in them is made specifically for co2 so doesn't deteriorate with the co2 like regular ones do
     
  11. Stuart_B

    Stuart_B Newly Registered

    Messages:
    14
    This is what a " screw down valve" looks like.( Im sure thats not the proper name for these valves) Its same as is used on other gas cylinders . Ive been trying to locate one to fit on a FE without success so far.
    Have you considered using a FE as so many aquarists do.. it just means taping the levers together ...same result. And FEs have a dip tube .

    Im guessing this company dont do courier deliveries further afield... can you say who they are ( or PM me)
     

    Attached Files:

  12. Iain mlaren

    Iain mlaren Member

    Messages:
    71
    Hi. I use the FE on my aquarium. It's very simple. Like you say just tape or put pin in lock position. I don't think co2 extinguishers have a pipe. Powder does as it sucks out the power. They have very little liquid in them. I'm guessing by screw down valve you mean the blue bubble counter. I don't have one of those I just go by the green check bowl and fish. All seems to be going well so far with FE running for roughly 3 months.
     
  13. Harvoification

    Harvoification Member

    Messages:
    56
    I'm scared to death of using a FE. I'd probably end up hurting myself or squirting liquid all over the walls

    Also... is setting up a 2kg pressurised co2 system in my bedroom a good idea? if it were to leak in the night, could it harm/kill me?
     
    Last edited: 11 Jan 2017
  14. Stuart_B

    Stuart_B Newly Registered

    Messages:
    14
    I think you'll find CO2 FEs DO have a dip tube . To clarify the Screw Down valve is the device in the picture on top of the extinguisher ... with the black knob you screw up and down to allow the CO2 through to the regulator. This new picture is what I mean
     

    Attached Files:

  15. Stuart_B

    Stuart_B Newly Registered

    Messages:
    14
    Obviously you dont operate the FE levers until you have the regulator attached.. you must not "fire" the extinguisher once the horn is removed I think you are overworrying about things.... why should you hurt yourself etc but perhaps you should find some other means of using CO2 if you really are scared . Does your house have any extinguishers?
     
  16. PARAGUAY

    PARAGUAY Member

    Messages:
    934
    You could purchase a 500g set like the DD ,and it suitable for disposable MIG welding bottles which would only set you back 14£.Really simple to set up and would last a lot longer than your Aqua One which is for small nano tanks
     
  17. ian_m

    ian_m Global Moderator Staff Member

    Messages:
    3,799
    1. Cylinder price is OK, if they are near you. It is your cylinder then, you can do what you like with it.
    2. Cylinders are stamped with a test date, that lasts 10 years. After that you must get them pressure tested. Usually not worth it for smaller cylinders and cylinders are scrapped.
    3. You don't need a dip tube as you are using CO2 gas. FE's have a dip tube so they vent liquid CO2, which turns to gas in the FE horn. However you are using so little CO2 in an aquarium setup there is absolutely no chance of liquid CO2 making it up the dip tube and out the cylinder.
    4. Valve type doesn't really matter. If a handle just tie it open using cable ties.
    5. I get my 2Kg FE's for £10 each.
    6. I have 10 spare 2Kg FE's in my garage in anyone wants any ??? All over 10 years old, not suitable for putting out fires but fine for fish tank use.
    7. Don't waste worries worrying about cylinder safety. We have about 20 cylinders at work, attached to the wall and all pressurised to 800 pounds per square inch and in the last 10 years no one has died. They are called carbon dioxide fire extinguishers.
     
  18. Iain mlaren

    Iain mlaren Member

    Messages:
    71
    Haha. See I was wrong. I didn't think they had dip tubes as they held very small amount of liquid. O well my bad. Listen to these guys they are more clued up than me lol. I use a fe tho and they are very safe. Cheap enough and easily available.
     

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