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FUN high CRI LED strips

Wookii

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Interesting! I’d be tempted to give them a go if it weren’t for the £187 for a 5m reel.

Are these the first consumer LED’s to offer this kind of sunlight equivalent full daylight spectrum @oreo57?
 

Wookii

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This strip light appears to use the same LED’s and is a more palatable price for experimentation!

 

Wookii

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A bit more digging and a company called ‘Remez’ has started using them in standard light bulbs. I can’t seem to source them in the UK, but AliExpress has them:

AliExpress

No shipping to the UK though unfortunately! Must not have passed UK regs approval yet or something?
 

oreo57

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Interesting! I’d be tempted to give them a go if it weren’t for the £187 for a 5m reel.

Are these the first consumer LED’s to offer this kind of sunlight equivalent full daylight spectrum @oreo57?
Well... afaict Yuji, SORRA, and Kyocera
have violet pump rgb phosphor and Cree and Luxeon have high cri blue pump diodes but
almost each of the above had an issue or 2 from poor longetivity to availability of chips to not high enough k temp for a decent look.
 

oreo57

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A bit more digging and a company called ‘Remez’ has started using them in standard light bulbs. I can’t seem to source them in the UK, but AliExpress has them:

AliExpress

No shipping to the UK though unfortunately! Must not have passed UK regs approval yet or something?
Well that is a bulb, not exactly what I was referring to. I just can' t ever get comfortable w/ aliexpress though..

Oh in the US forgot this retailer.
ABSOLUTE SERIES 99 CRI LED Technology | Waveform Lighting

Violet emitters are nowhere near ( or were) as efficient as royal blue.
Secondly blue phosphors for leds were not as stable as others.
So always watch est. lifespans..
 
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erwin123

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There are a lot of videos/articles on how to DIY High CRI lights for video. Quite informative (though for aquarium lights waterproofing/electrical safety has to be considered).
For video, I'm using softboxes with a standard e27 mount and high CRI E27 light bulbs.

Interesting fact from google - California has Regulation called Title 24 that all residential lighting must be CRI 90 or higher... which suggests it would be pretty easy to get high CRI bulbs in the USA whereas in my country the common bulbs are the philips >CRI 80 LEDs.
 
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Wookii

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Well that is a bulb, not exactly what I was referring to. I just can' t ever get comfortable w/ aliexpress though..

Oh in the US forgot this retailer.
ABSOLUTE SERIES 99 CRI LED Technology | Waveform Lighting

Violet emitters are nowhere near ( or were) as efficient as royal blue.
Secondly blue phosphors for leds were not as stable as others.
So always watch est. lifespans..

Yeah, I don’t use AilExpress either for the same reasons, but for £5 it’d be worth a punt.

I know your original link was to LED strips, but if the exact same LED can be had in a commercially available bulb, that would be even easier for testing of colour rendition on an aquarium.

It’s also surely the holy grail for aquarium lighting - full sunlight spectral response in a dimmable bulb that can be used in any domestic light fitting. Most people could light their tank for less than £20 if they chose. (I appreciated people could do that now, but the LED performance doesn’t match the best dedicated aquarium lights currently).

For me personally, if I could get these LED’s in a GU10 bulb format, that would be perfect for some suspended pendants - and there are plenty of water proof garden fitting available to house them.
 
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Wookii

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There are a lot of videos/articles on how to DIY High CRI lights for video. Quite informative (though for aquarium lights waterproofing/electrical safety has to be considered).
For video, I'm using softboxes with a standard e27 mount and high CRI E27 light bulbs.

Interesting fact from google - California has Regulation called Title 24 that all residential lighting must be CRI 90 or higher... which suggests it would be pretty easy to get high CRI bulbs in the USA whereas in my country the common bulbs are the philips >CRI 80 LEDs.

Whilst there are many high CRI LED’s available, the key point is none of them match the spectral response of natural sunlight very well at all, and no where near as well as those linked to by @oreo57 - particularly at the red end of the spectrum, which is frequently why white LED aquarium lights often have washed out reds (and other colours) unless they are boosted by additional red LED’s, or are pure RGB combination LED’s (Chihiros, ADA Solar RGB etc).

That would be the key test for me if we could get our hands on these new LED’s - what would be the final colour rendition? Hopefully better than either traditional white LED’s and combination RGB LED’s.
 

zozo

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Don't get your hopes too high up with those newly invented CRI numbers, I guess it still is as vaguely and likely as non-standardized as the older °K values.

What they basically do to get a CRI number is use a table of a few standard colours.
tcs.png


Place this under the sun at 5000K and look at the colours, then place the same table under an artificial 5000K light source and look at the colours again.
Now if the colours reflect fairly the same under the artificial 5000K then it means the spectrum is similar to 5000K sunlight and it gets a high CRI number.

I wonder a bit how and when and where and at what time and condition did they determine the sun being 5000°K and look at this colour palette and record it, bring this back indoors to test and compare all artificial lights? They probably have a nice story to take you for a ride and pump up the price. But how would you as the consumer test its validity? In the end, there is no guarantee that you as a buyer and spectator will like what you see when looking at a different colour palette under this light...

How can one standardize a taste?
:)
 
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Wookii

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Don't get your hopes too high up with those newly invented CRI numbers, I guess it still is as vaguely and likely as non-standardized as the older °K values.

What they basically do to get a CRI number is use a table of a few standard colours.
tcs.png


Place this under the sun at 5000K and look at the colours, then place the same table under an artificial 5000K light source and look at the colours again.
Now if the colours reflect fairly the same under the artificial 5000K then it means the spectrum is similar to 5000K sunlight and it gets a high CRI number.

I wonder a bit how and when and where and at what time and condition did they determine the sun being 5000°K and look at this colour palette and record it, bring this back indoors to test and compare all artificial lights? They probably have a nice story to take you for a ride, but how would you as the consumer test its validity? In the end, there is no guarantee that you as a buyer and spectator will like what you see when looking at a different colour palette under this light... :)

I don’t think the CRI number is particularly relevant either - personally it was the published spectral response I was looking at:

sunlike-spectrum-comparison.png


Ref: Seoul Semiconductor SunLike Natural Spectrum LEDs reveal color and depth of artistic works
 

oreo57

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Don't get your hopes too high up with those newly invented CRI numbers, I guess it still is as vaguely and likely as non-standardized as the older °K values.

What they basically do to get a CRI number is use a table of a few standard colours.
tcs.png


Place this under the sun at 5000K and look at the colours, then place the same table under an artificial 5000K light source and look at the colours again.
Now if the colours reflect fairly the same under the artificial 5000K then it means the spectrum is similar to 5000K sunlight and it gets a high CRI number.

I wonder a bit how and when and where and at what time and condition did they determine the sun being 5000°K and look at this colour palette and record it, bring this back indoors to test and compare all artificial lights? They probably have a nice story to take you for a ride and pump up the price. But how would you as the consumer test its validity? In the end, there is no guarantee that you as a buyer and spectator will like what you see when looking at a different colour palette under this light...

How can one standardize a taste?
:)
Suppose I should mentioned that there is a " new" CRI ..


The R(f) score is high. Uses 99 patches..
There will always be differences since how the spectrum is created is different.
Led, metal halides, t5s are not black body sources .
Of course nothing is perfect.
Although planets and stars are neither in thermal equilibrium with their surroundings nor perfect black bodies, black-body radiation is used as a first approximation for the energy they emit
If you want to go down another rabbit hole, even people's individual perceptions of color varies.
But research has found that we experience colors differently, depending on gender, national origin, ethnicity, geographical location, and what language we speak. In other words, there is nothing objective about colors
 
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oreo57

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One word if caution is " natural" is not always perceived as "best".
Rgb arrays with high R(g) (representing saturation an d > 100) and lower R(f) representing color fidelity) may " look" better to some.

Personally the 2 schools look really different to me. Not better or worse, just different.
Hard to describe ....

One thing though . Both look better than standard white leds alone
 

zozo

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If you want to go down another rabbit hole, even people's individual perceptions of color varies.

This specific topic is discussed in the podcast from 2016 bellow

Interview with Cara Wade, she works as a researcher for a manufacturer developing Horticultural grow lights. They used to contain the company BuildMyLED for aquariums which they, unfortunately, discontinued for economical reasons. Anyway, she mentions as long as the light is in the white spectrum plants will grow regardlessly of the rest of the spectrum. One should choose a light colour that looks best to the personal perception since it's only you that needs to look at it and like it. :)
 
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hwscot

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Interesting! I’d be tempted to give them a go if it weren’t for the £187 for a 5m reel.

Are these the first consumer LED’s to offer this kind of sunlight equivalent full daylight spectrum @oreo57?
There's loads of good LED stuff on the photo lighting market. I've been shooting portraits with LED continuous lighting for several years. I use a 150W and a 60W .. CRI around 95 is widely available. For some reason the 60W heads have gone up a bit the last year or so, from around £100 to more like £120 or £150. Have often wondered how they would work as aquarium lights. There's all sorts of light modifiers for reasonable money.
This is the kind of thing.
 

Wookii

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There's loads of good LED stuff on the photo lighting market. I've been shooting portraits with LED continuous lighting for several years. I use a 150W and a 60W .. CRI around 95 is widely available. For some reason the 60W heads have gone up a bit the last year or so, from around £100 to more like £120 or £150. Have often wondered how they would work as aquarium lights. There's all sorts of light modifiers for reasonable money.
This is the kind of thing.

Agreed, there is lots of good value LED stuff around, but as mentioned above it’s not the CRI that’s particularly important - with the LED’s mentioned in the OP it’s specifically that these LED’s can fairly closely match the spectral response of natural sunlight in a way that most other LED’s fail miserably at, that makes them of interest.
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
It’s also surely the holy grail for aquarium lighting - full sunlight spectral response in a dimmable bulb that can be used in any domestic light fitting. Most people could light their tank for less than £20 if they chose.
Coming soon would be my guess.

cheers Darrel
 

erwin123

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You'll have to test one out for us - I can't see it for sale on the side of the pond.
Europeans already have access to Philips ExpertColor MasterLED, CRI97 R9>85, in either 12v GU5.3 or GU10 mounts.

However, it is 4000k which might be too yellow for some (probably have to mix in some 6500k), whereas the GE is 5000k.


Amazon product
 
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