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Fluval Sea Liquid Calcium

REDSTEVEO

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Hi all,
I have a question about the use of Fluval Sea Liquid Calcium in Fresh Water Aquariums. In my heavily planted Jewel Rio 200 litre tank I have a few Cory's, three Red Bristlenose Plecs, and a lot of Red Cherry Shrimp.
This tank has only got 2 x T5 Tubes above it and the reflectors are tilted slightly upwards. I use EI Dosing at half dosage rates.

The plants and mosses have grown like crazy, and the shrimp are deep Red and very healthy, multiplying at an amazing rate.

But here's the thing, I have been adding the Fluval Sea Liquid Calcium at 10ml every few weeks. I swear that this has contributed to the health if the plants, the mosses and the shrimp.

Yet I can't seem to find any information on the use of it in Fresh Water Aquariums.

Does anyone else use it or has anyone else tried it.

It works for me, but I just thought I would see what people's opinions are.
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Nick potts

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Calcium is a nutrient for plants, and it will certainly be of benefit to the shrimps who use it to build their exoskeletons. Many shrimp keepers will add calcium to their tanks, usually either powdered or via something like coral sand or oyster shells which dissolve and release calcium into the water.

The fact that is it is marine marketed won't matter
 

three-fingers

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Fluval Sea Liquid Calcium is just calcium chloride, dissolved in water. So you are paying for the packaging and fuel/logistics costs of shipping mainly water.

I used to use Kent Marine Liquid Calcium (which is the same) all the time for my snails due to my soft water, until I realised it is muuuuuuch cheaper in powder form off eBay - like this listing for £1.69 shipped.

Much better for the environment, and lasts ridiculously longer, as that £1.69 would make me 2 x 500ml of liquid concentrate, which would cost £30-40 if you bought that much in Fluval bottles.

I don't think liquid calcium is really neccesary for freshwater use in any case, as there are better options if your water is seriously deficient of calcium and have critters that really need bioavailable calcium. In that case you would be much safer adding some crushed sea shells or aragonite to your filter/substrate. But I think some snail species especially may benefit from making sure there's extra calcium around in otherwise soft water, so I still use it for peace of mind and especially when doing bigger water changes. If I couldn't buy the powder online for some reason I might be tempted to buy pre-packaged stuff again...but I'd probably rather spend the money on an ice lolly and spending some time at the beach collecting shells :).
 
Last edited:

ceg4048

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Hi Steve,
I agree with three-fingers mate. As far as plants go, calcium is a micronutrient, so it's content merely needs to non-zero. If your water is soft, or if using RO, you can always used the crushed-coral-in-the filter routine. If using hard water from tap then yeah, it's pretty much redundant.

Cheers,
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
Fluval Sea Liquid Calcium at 10ml every few weeks. I swear that this has contributed to the health if the plants, the mosses and the shrimp.

Yet I can't seem to find any information on the use of it in Fresh Water Aquariums.
The fact that is it is marine marketed won't matter
But it does make it expensive
Fluval Sea Liquid Calcium is just calcium chloride, dissolved in water. So you are paying for the packaging and fuel/logistics costs of shipping mainly water.

I used to use Kent Marine Liquid Calcium (which is the same) all the time for my snails due to my soft water, until I realised it is muuuuuuch cheaper in powder form
As far as plants go, calcium is a micronutrient, so it's content merely needs to non-zero. If your water is soft, or if using RO, you can always used the crushed-coral-in-the filter routine. If using hard water from tap then yeah, it's pretty much redundant.
Same as the above. The details for CaCl2.2H2O are <"here">.

We have some details for "Brightwell Calcion", and how we think they make their solution, and I would be very surprised if Fluval do anything different.

cheers Darrel
 

REDSTEVEO

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Hi all,





Same as the above. The details for CaCl2.2H2O are <"here">.

We have some details for "Brightwell Calcion", and how we think they make their solution, and I would be very surprised if Fluval do anything different.

cheers Darrel
Thanks Darrel,

So in short, apart from the expense of buying the Fluval Sea Calcium, there is no actual harm in adding extra Calcium to the water, even though this product is intended for the Marine Reef Tank.
 

REDSTEVEO

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Thread starter
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Messages
1,388
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Planet Earth
Fluval Sea Liquid Calcium is just calcium chloride, dissolved in water. So you are paying for the packaging and fuel/logistics costs of shipping mainly water.

I used to use Kent Marine Liquid Calcium (which is the same) all the time for my snails due to my soft water, until I realised it is muuuuuuch cheaper in powder form off eBay - like this listing for £1.69 shipped.

Much better for the environment, and lasts ridiculously longer, as that £1.69 would make me 2 x 500ml of liquid concentrate, which would cost £30-40 if you bought that much in Fluval bottles.

I don't think liquid calcium is really neccesary for freshwater use in any case, as there are better options if your water is seriously deficient of calcium and have critters that really need bioavailable calcium. In that case you would be much safer adding some crushed sea shells or aragonite to your filter/substrate. But I think some snail species especially may benefit from making sure there's extra calcium around in otherwise soft water, so I still use it for peace of mind and especially when doing bigger water changes. If I couldn't buy the powder online for some reason I might be tempted to buy pre-packaged stuff again...but I'd probably rather spend the money on an ice lolly and spending some time at the beach collecting shells :).
Hi, and thanks for the linky thing. So you just buy that Calcium Chloride from ebay and mix one packet in a litre of water and that gives you 2 x 500ml bottles?

Is that the same concentration of Calcium Chloride as per the Fluval Sea Liquid Calcium? It states on the bottle that I have got that it is a 227ml / 8 fluid ounces, and the concentration is the equivalent of 150,000 mg/l.
 

Nick potts

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I suck at maths, and even worse at chemistry, but I believe if you add 500g of calcium chloride to 1L of water you will end up with a concentration of 180,000ppm or thereabouts, but it really doesn't matter all that much if the concentration is off a bit.
 

dw1305

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Hi all,
Is that the same concentration of Calcium Chloride as per the Fluval Sea Liquid Calcium? It states on the bottle that I have got that it is a 227ml / 8 fluid ounces, and the concentration is the equivalent of 150,000 mg/l.
It will be, the workings of <"how and why are in the linked thread">.
So in short, apart from the expense of buying the Fluval Sea Calcium, there is no actual harm in adding extra Calcium to the water, even though this product is intended for the Marine Reef Tank.
No, ions don't know where they've come from, every Ca++ ion is the same as every other one.
there is no actual harm in adding extra Calcium to the water
Most people have the alternative problem, too much calcium in their water. It is always easier to add salts than take them away.

cheers Darrel
 
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