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Fluval Plant 3.0 low tech settings

Muso1981

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Hi Everyone,

I've got a Fluval Roma 240 and the plant 3.0 light. Can anyone recommend the best settings with this light for low tech?

I've included my current settings which are ok but I'm starting to get the dreaded black beard algae.

Thanks in advance!
 

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John q

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Ignore Mr pascoe.... the plant 3 in a roma 240 will be putting about 70/80/ par at substrate, at 50%, well do the maths, I'd suggest you put the lights at 20% to 25 % and then increase if needed.

Could be wrong, and I don't have a youtube channel, but I do have experience with fluval tanks.. and fluval lights.

Low tech, low light.. its the future 😀

Edited on realisation you probably have the 46w fixture not the 59w.
 
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Muso1981

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Thank you John, so would that be set everything to 20%? How about photoperiod?

I'd watched the Bentley Pascoe videos but didn't really follow it to be honest.
 

tam

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I think mines about 30% (not close enough to connect atm) - and I have a slow ramp up/down. I think I picked a pre-set I liked the colour tone of then reduced them all down proportionately.
 

John q

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I'd suggest 15/30min ramp up, 15/30min ramp down, duration at 8hrs seems fine, you could live on the edge and up it to 9hrs.
Channel settings?? What looks good to you, this is my setting based on looks (aquasky 2.0) so only 4 channels.
Screenshot_20211128-192156_FluvalSmart.jpg
 

Muso1981

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Thanks John, I've just set everything to 30% let's see what happens.

Something Pascoe mentioned I'd that Blue light can cause Algae, I've read this a few places too. There's so much information out there it's confusing and everyone seems to be an expert!
 

Jack B

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Thanks John, I've just set everything to 30% let's see what happens.

Something Pascoe mentioned I'd that Blue light can cause Algae, I've read this a few places too. There's so much information out there it's confusing and everyone seems to be an expert!
For what it's worth, knocking off the blue light altogether seemed to help my minor BBA problem
 

Muso1981

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I can't help but think that Blue light promotes algae growth. When I altered my settings at the beginning of the week and set everything to 25% in two days I had algae on the front glass which isn't something I was getting with my previous settings.
So I've changed my settings back to what they were before.

Maybe I keep the blue light low and reduce the other colours to help with the BBA which seems to be spreading?
 

Stan510

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Blue/cool lights always get the BBA growing. You might even include north and eastern window light also. I posted many a time,the old purple light always makes everything look great and the plants respond and bad algae tends to die off. You might get that nice green furry algae..but thats eaten by Ancistrus- Panda fish and in between.
When my present Fluorescent fixtures' ballast dies? I'm am without a doubt going LED that can be made to fit or adjust to what YOU like..and I trust what all of you like are plants that look green,and red fish that are red.
The last thing I want are those hideous Kessel lights that blast a yellow cast with annoying shimmer. Hard to believe people want that.
 

MichaelJ

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Blue/cool lights always get the BBA growing. You might even include north and eastern window light also. I posted many a time,the old purple light always makes everything look great and the plants respond and bad algae tends to die off.
Not really... If the condition in your tank is primed for it, algae will be a nuisance regardless of the color or spectral distribution of your light... there is hardly any correlation.

Cheers,
Michael
 

Stan510

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God yes! Its very well known spectrum grows plants AND the human requirement that it looks good to the eye. I was just reading UKAPS on lighting and they even mentioned that the T-5 with purple and Osram daylight gave a very pleasing look and grew plants. I've seen shady streams grow lots of brown algae and only in the sun did you see thick plant growth..plus the green algaes.
I know that people save money using LED's meant for illuminating garages,and I could never live with that. Neons are not neon on that light.
I used to mix bulbs..Two purple,one white and one red-orange. That made for nice color rendition and plant growth. Now? I go back and forth on what to do when my twin 40 watts ballast- or bulbs go out. T-5? LED with adjustable spectrum at double the cost of T-5's?
Still not sure.
 

arcturus

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Any actual science behind any of this?
Algae and bacteria such as cyanobacteria have a <higher photosynthetic efficiency than higher plants>. This basically means that if you are providing a source of energy that is below the threshold required to activate plant photosynthesis but above the threshold to trigger algae/bacteria photosynthesis, then you are satisfying a necessary (but not sufficient) condition for algae to thrive. Moreover, algae grow <faster than plants> which makes the matters worse. So, light that is beneficial to plant growth also benefits algae. The problem is that light that brings zero benefits to plants, such as low energy blue lights to simulate moonlight, can benefit algae if the energy is high enough. You <find studies> looking at the impact of light colour in algae and bacteria that show preference towards specific spectral ranges. However, this has little impact in an aquarium because most lights cover a relative wide colour spectrum.

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MichaelJ

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Neons are not neon on that light.
Right on...(Stan, my wife calls that light Walmart light)
Pick the light that makes your plants and fish look the best. Your light will have to be so far off the rails for it to make a difference or be a problem... (and if your light is that far off you might have another problem unrelated to the hobby :lol:...) The whole spectral distribution vs. plant growth vs. algae has been beaten to death on this forum several times over. You may find science that support the idea either way under very narrow circumstances, and yes, if you have an algae problem already due to too much light intensity vs. nutrients (mainly CO2), lack of flow and general maintenance - the real reasons why you have an algae problem to begin with - you may somewhat exacerbate the problem with your choice of light. However, changing the color of your light to fight algae is like putting a band aid on a gunshot wound.... on the other end, if you have the right conditions for your plants in terms of light intensity vs. nutrients, flow, maintenance etc. your plants will grow just fine regardless and you wont have an algae problem.


Cheers,
Michael
 
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