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Filter experiment to control algae

Joined
12 Jul 2021
Messages
4
Location
Uk
Juwel 450 with the following
1 x fluval 405
2 x fluval 406
1 x fluval 407
1 x fluval fx5 (not fully cycled been in one month)

Has anyone else tried massive over filtration to control algae?

Currently have bba, but looks like it is retreating. Dosing 1/2 tblsp know 1/4 tsp kh2po4 3 x week, & trace every other day. Plants are growing extremely well. Co2 injection.

Any thoughts
 

Vsevolod Stakhov

New Member
Joined
31 Aug 2020
Messages
22
Location
Cambridge
I have tried it successfully to control GDA/BGA. The key factor was surprisingly 'never clean or touch filters' + maximum amount of filter media possible. Clogging was avoided by using plastic K1/HelX rings and matala mats (no mechanic filtering at all). BBA/Staghorn are more tough for me: they don't grow like a fire with good filtration but never disappear completely. Probably, that's not the ideal result but, huh, my filters now require zero maintenance which is a good thing per se.
 

ceg4048

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UKAPS Team
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9,455
Location
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Juwel 450 with the following
1 x fluval 405
2 x fluval 406
1 x fluval 407
1 x fluval fx5 (not fully cycled been in one month)

Has anyone else tried massive over filtration to control algae?

Currently have bba, but looks like it is retreating. Dosing 1/2 tblsp know 1/4 tsp kh2po4 3 x week, & trace every other day. Plants are growing extremely well. Co2 injection.

Any thoughts
Hello,
Filtration per se has little to do with reduction of BBA. The aspect of the filters that do the work are the pumps which provide flow and distribution of the CO2 and nutrients. A 450 liter tank ideally require a rated flow 4500 L/hour for proper distribution of the gas and nutrients.
BBA is a CO2 related algae so it is entirely logical and consistent that application of high flow rates evenly distributed within the tank delivers the gas to the plants thereby making them healthy and suppressing BBA blooms.

Cheers,
 

Vsevolod Stakhov

New Member
Joined
31 Aug 2020
Messages
22
Location
Cambridge
BBA is a CO2 related algae so it is entirely logical and consistent that application of high flow rates evenly distributed within the tank delivers the gas to the plants thereby making them healthy and suppressing BBA blooms.
Yes, I've made exactly the same observations. Exceed of BBA/Staghorn means some problem in CO2 distribution, one time it was an empty CO2 bottle, another time it was inadequate CO2 levels comparing to the increase of the plants mass (my drop-checker turned blue occasionally). That caused two main effects: holes in the old leaves accompanied by red algae. However, 'fixing' CO2 issues have not eliminated red algae completely. Perhaps, I have not fixed those issues completely, but I don't know.
 

erwin123

Member
Joined
4 Mar 2021
Messages
200
Location
Singapore
Hello,
Filtration per se has little to do with reduction of BBA. The aspect of the filters that do the work are the pumps which provide flow and distribution of the CO2 and nutrients. A 450 liter tank ideally require a rated flow 4500 L/hour for proper distribution of the gas and nutrients.
BBA is a CO2 related algae so it is entirely logical and consistent that application of high flow rates evenly distributed within the tank delivers the gas to the plants thereby making them healthy and suppressing BBA blooms.

Cheers,


Juwel 450 with the following
1 x fluval 405
2 x fluval 406
1 x fluval 407
1 x fluval fx5 (not fully cycled been in one month)

Has anyone else tried massive over filtration to control algae?

Currently have bba, but looks like it is retreating. Dosing 1/2 tblsp know 1/4 tsp kh2po4 3 x week, & trace every other day. Plants are growing extremely well. Co2 injection.

Any thoughts

I am using 2 canister filters for my 100 litre tank (60x45x40).

I came to UKAPS and learnt that "plants are the filter" and you need to make sure your "plant filter" is working well by ensuring a steady "flow" of nutrients/CO2.

Since then, I have reduced the amount of filter media (Matrix and other 'bio' media) in my canister filters and increased the amount of sponges (higher flow and some mechanical filtering too)!

I still have mechanical filtration for aesthetic reasons (i.e. to clean up the mess the Cories make digging the substrate) :cool:
 

PARAGUAY

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Joined
13 Nov 2013
Messages
2,254
Location
Lancashire
Juwel 450 with the following
1 x fluval 405
2 x fluval 406
1 x fluval 407
1 x fluval fx5 (not fully cycled been in one month)

Has anyone else tried massive over filtration to control algae?

Currently have bba, but looks like it is retreating. Dosing 1/2 tblsp know 1/4 tsp kh2po4 3 x week, & trace every other day. Plants are growing extremely well. Co2 injection.

Any thoughts
Interesting to see progress on this
 

Zeus.

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Messages
4,214
Location
Yorkshire,UK
Like @ceg4048 said :thumbup:, in a well planted tank its the plants that take care of the biological filtration mainly and the filter can form a detritus trap/filter, when the filter collects the detritus it needs cleaning regularly especially if you have fine filtration ( and even with medium and coarse filtration only). As when the filter media gets clogged it reduces filter output which will have two effects 1, reduced turnover in tank - which can lead to CO2 fluctuations, which can lead to algae. 2, reduce flow in filter leads to decreased O2 levels in filter and our canisters are mainly anaerobic to start with, so a better flow in filter increase flow/[O2] so the denitrification process gets the O2 its needs, which in turn converts potentially harmful ammonium compounds and nitrites to harmless nitrates. Always good to have some headroom in the denitrification process as if a fish dies and we don't spot it at least the tank can handle the extra load.
I cleaned my FX6 weekly in my 500L when it was high tech, sponges was always dirty.

To quote the master of CO2 again - 'Flow is King'
 

martinpsmith33@protonmail

Seedling
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12 Jul 2021
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Uk
My theory is that in nature there is masses of surface area for the bacteria to grow on, so the more filtration you have the closer to nature you get.
 

Zeus.

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dw1305

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nr Bath
Hi all,
My theory is that in nature there is masses of surface area for the bacteria to grow on, so the more filtration you have the closer to nature you get.
I understand what you are saying, but there are <"two things to bear in mind">:
cheers Darrel
 

ForestDave

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12 Nov 2020
Messages
281
Location
Forest of Dean
Like @ceg4048 said :thumbup:, in a well planted tank its the plants that take care of the biological filtration mainly and the filter can form a detritus trap/filter, when the filter collects the detritus it needs cleaning regularly especially if you have fine filtration ( and even with medium and coarse filtration only). As when the filter media gets clogged it reduces filter output which will have two effects 1, reduced turnover in tank - which can lead to CO2 fluctuations, which can lead to algae. 2, reduce flow in filter leads to decreased O2 levels in filter and our canisters are mainly anaerobic to start with, so a better flow in filter increase flow/[O2] so the denitrification process gets the O2 its needs, which in turn converts potentially harmful ammonium compounds and nitrites to harmless nitrates. Always good to have some headroom in the denitrification process as if a fish dies and we don't spot it at least the tank can handle the extra load.
I cleaned my FX6 weekly in my 500L when it was high tech, sponges was always dirty.

To quote the master of CO2 again - 'Flow is King'
Hi Zeus.
I removed my filter floss yesterday after reading a post from you about improving flow to better distribute the CO2. I also have 2 trays in my FX6 with a bag of ceramic filter rings in each ://www.finest-filters.co.uk/500g-ceramic-filter-rings/ . Would you suggest getting rid of these as well and swapping them out for a sheet of coarse foam?

The reason I ask is that I am struggling with an alternanthera reineckii, which is growing slowly I think but the leaves are brown/green. I'm also ramping up my CO2 as I am not convinced the 1ph drop reading from my cheap pen is a full 1ph drop.
Cheers!

 

Zeus.

Fertz Calc Meister
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I use to have my FX6 rammed with Biohome, then I tuned it down
1626250358560.png

Using the course and medium sponges and a little ceramic in each free tray, even have a couple trays empty nowadays
 

erwin123

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Joined
4 Mar 2021
Messages
200
Location
Singapore
It just occurred to me - if you are massively overfiltering, how /what do you feed your fish? Seems like floating fish food might be problematic because the filters will suck in the food before they are completely eaten? Or do you go with sinking wafers only?
 

Zeus.

Fertz Calc Meister
Joined
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Messages
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Location
Yorkshire,UK
It just occurred to me - if you are massively overfiltering, how /what do you feed your fish? Seems like floating fish food might be problematic because the filters will suck in the food before they are completely eaten? Or do you go with sinking wafers only?
I get round it with a PLC one press of button and Ehiem skimmer is off for 20mins and Maxspect Gyres (which take care of tank turnover) off for 10mins, any that gets sucked into FX6 RCS take care off as there's always plenty of them in there when I come to clean the filter when I do it regularly, on smaller tank I don't have fish just RCS
 

ceg4048

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Yes, I've made exactly the same observations. Exceed of BBA/Staghorn means some problem in CO2 distribution, one time it was an empty CO2 bottle, another time it was inadequate CO2 levels comparing to the increase of the plants mass (my drop-checker turned blue occasionally). That caused two main effects: holes in the old leaves accompanied by red algae. However, 'fixing' CO2 issues have not eliminated red algae completely. Perhaps, I have not fixed those issues completely, but I don't know.
Hi,
BBA is tenacious and does not typically go away just because you have fixed your CO2 issues. They have to be forced out by mechanical and/or chemical methods accompanied by frequent and very large water changes. Remove the tufts as often as you can and after a few weeks they will decline. Overdosing liquid carbon products such as Excel or equivalent is a good way to remove the tufts. You will see them turn pink/purple and then you can remove them.

Cheers,
 

ForestDave

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I get round it with a PLC one press of button and Ehiem skimmer is off for 20mins and Maxspect Gyres (which take care of tank turnover) off for 10mins, any that gets sucked into FX6 RCS take care off as there's always plenty of them in there when I come to clean the filter when I do it regularly, on smaller tank I don't have fish just RCS
Those shrimp are proper tough! I’ve accidentally sucked a load into my FX6 a few times before and they’ve all been fine. They seem to love it in there in the pitch black surrounded by filter scum. 😂
 

martinpsmith33@protonmail

Seedling
Thread starter
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All the intakes are at the back, I just feed 1/2 a teaspoon of food at the front, the flow sends it all over and the fish chase it.
 

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