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Bloodworm cultivation

castle

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Joined
19 Dec 2015
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Location
UK
I’ve come up with a way to get lots of blood worms.

About 1 inch of clay, in a wide-ish tub with about 30cm of water. Leave for two weeks and there are hundreds.

However I can’t seem to come up with a way to separate larvae from mud; vigorously mixing the solution to break up the clay doesn’t really work as worms die. Note I do mix up the clay as worms are in it, but not do much that it would pass through a muslin.

Any ideas to optimise this?
 
Turns out after a bit of reading that this is the way to do it 😩 may aswell just scoop the bottom of a river every now and then. It’ll be less effort and more productive.
 
Hi all,
I’ve come up with a way to get lots of blood worms. ........ About 1 inch of clay, in a wide-ish tub with about 30cm of water. Leave for two weeks and there are hundreds.
If you put a twig or similar in they will congregate on that, I don't know why. You could also try mix some leaf mold in, they will tend to end up in the leaf mouldy layer on top.

You can also try swirling the clay worm mix around, loose Blood worms will come to the top and often you can scoop them up as they float at the surface.
may aswell just scoop the bottom of a river every now and then. It’ll be less effort and more productive.
The advantage of "ranching" your own is that you know they've been grown in clean conditions.

cheers Darrel
 
Worth to keep in mind is the risk of developing allergies, and I try to avoid bloodworms as much as possible for that reason (I come in contact with them every now and then at work, so an allergy would be a bit annoying). Is there anything that's particularly good nutrition-wise about bloodworms? Compared to say blackworms or black mosquito larvae.
 
Hi all,
Is there anything that's particularly good nutrition-wise about bloodworms? Compared to say blackworms or black mosquito larvae.
I don't think there is, they would offer more chitin than Blackworms (Lumbriculus variegatus), but should be pretty similar to other Mosquito larvae in nutritional composition.

The "advantage" of them is that they occur in commercially collectible quantities at sites with <"gross organic pollution"> and I wouldn't feed the fish ones I've purchased, in any form, for that reason.

cheers Darrel
 
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Yeah @dw1305 i did notice they came to the surface but the water is so filthy, I guess my net is too fine to let suspended soil particles through. I’ll have a go at the sticks and see what’s up.

As for allergies @Tyko_N I’ve been handling bloodworms for most of life in one way or another. No allergies yet, I did read a mention about allergies with blood worms in “culturing live foods” but until I react 🤷‍♂️ as for nutritional value, just part of a healthy mixed diet.

Currently feeding:
  • Mosquito larvae
  • Black worms
  • Banana worms
  • Brine shrimp (baby)
  • Grindal worms (culture looks like it’s crashed)
  • Tubifex
  • Black worms
  • And Bug Bites flakes and pellets.
a bit of effort, but trying to spawn some iguanodectes geisleri and I find a varied diet helps 👍

 
Hi all,
I guess my net is too fine to let suspended soil particles through
<"Pound shop"> plastic tea strainer? I use them a lot and they are perfect for this.

If you wash the collected blood worms (and "extra" clay) into a tray etc., the blood worms will rebuild their protective cocoons from the clay and then you can wash them out a lot more easily. Using the "leaf mold" method, I just <"leave them over night"> and they will have collected all the leaf fragments by the morning.
I’ve been handling bloodworms for most of life in one way or another. No allergies yet
Same for me, but I know it is quite a common allergy. From the linked abstract <"Chironomid midge allergy - PubMed">
... Chironomidae larvae and midges cause allergic reactions in approximately 20 percent of exposed people; predominantly aquarists using insect larvae as fish food ........ Our studies include 642 subjects of whom 205 are aquarists; 85 are occupationally and 352 environmentally exposed people. 123 of them were shown to be sensitized to these insects. Using highly purified allergens, we could demonstrate that Chironomidae hemoglobins (Chi t I) represent the major allergenic components causing rhinitis, conjunctivitis and bronchial asthma.......
  • Mosquito larvae
  • Black worms
  • Banana worms
  • Brine shrimp (baby)
  • Grindal worms (culture looks like it’s crashed)
  • Tubifex
  • Black worms
  • And Bug Bites flakes and pellets.
I wouldn't worry too much about the bloodworms, that is still plenty of variety without them. When I've had surface orientated fish I've always tried to get them to breed in <"Mosquito season">. The other food that appears to be <"cat-nip"> to most fish are Crangonyx pseudogracilis.

If I ever <"have another go"> with Dicrossus spp. I'm going to keep them on a <"crustacean based diet">, and only feed them Black or Grindal worms for conditioning.

cheers Darrel
 
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I know it is quite a common allergy.
I can’t touch the things at all and avoid them. If I touch them and don’t wash my hands my hands will become lumpy and extremely itchy, if I accidentally touch my face my whole face swells up.
 
If I ever <"have another go"> with Dicrossus spp. I'm going to keep them on a <"crustacean based diet">, and only feed them Black or Grindal worms for conditioning.

Mine have spawned 6 times over 12 months, but only 3 have made it to adulthood. Sadly I think farlowella (feels impossible) carried something nasty and they’ve got dropsy, and fin rot. Trying everything to get them better, a very live and kicking diet is doing wonders. It’s been a month and they are improving.

Adorable fish, love the way they move leaves looking for food.
 
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