Aponogeton Madagascariensis and dark matter

Hanuman

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I got this Aponogeton Madagascariensis sp. as a gift from a customer. The plant is in a small sucker cup temporarily in my nursery tank as I don't have space at ground level in both of my tanks. It grows rather fast to my surprise and produces a leaf every week. Plant has been doing fine for the past 2 months with nice spotless green leaves but I noticed some black/brown spots developing since last week. They don't look like algae but could be, not sure. The dark spots are not soft to the touch as initially I though it could be decaying matter. I am unsure what is happening as all other plants look fine.

In case it is algae, what is less aggressive to this lace plant; Hydrogen peroxide or Seachem Excel?

If it's not an algae any pointers what is happening to the plant?
IMG_2742.jpg

IMG_2741.jpg

IMG_2740.jpg
 
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dw1305

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Hi all,
If it's not an algae any pointers what is happening to the plant?
I don't think it is algal. It looks more like the leaf is just beginning to decay. If you look at the plant from the side, if these leaves are low down, and on the outside of the plant, they are the oldest leaves.

cheers Darrel
 

Hanuman

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Yes the one with the most dark spots is the oldest leaf (3rd picture). However the one on the right (second picture) is among the new ones and other new leaves have similar spots but to a lesser degree.

Would you advise simply trimming them and is this expected for a young plant like this one?
 
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Tim Harrison

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It could be that the light intensity is too high. I've grown them successfully in a low-light tank, with just a couple of T12 fluorescents. I also think they like slightly cooler temps, and the bulb needs to be placed half in, half out, of the substrate to stop it rotting.
Also, have you read The Secrets of the Madagascar Lace Plant by Ted Coletti. He reckons it's possible that high light could trigger a dormancy period. I guess because it simulates the summer dry season.
 

Mick.Dk

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A couple of things, to know about this plant(s) (=there are several varieties/species):
Though being tuberous, they are really, really hungry plants. A capsule of fertilisers at the roots, at surficient intervals(as pr. instructions of ferts) often make a huge difference. Seeing the amount of developing leaves within just a few weeks, when plant starts growing, makes this quite logical.
Despite the rather "fragile" appearance, the leaves are actually quite tough. This plant seem to do best, when watercirculation is relatively high.
Historically these plants have been considered "difficult" to grow. This is likely why we tend to think they need very high light and temperature. They can grow in such conditions, but seem to "over-metabolise", leading to very fast growth and very short life-time of each leaf (exactly the way OP experience). They will actually do better with less light and moderate temperature, though growing slower. Added CO2 works fine - but is not really needed.
As a "fun fact" it will often produce a 2 - 5 divided, purple "pipe-cleaner"-like flower of quite strong and pleasant scent. With some luck, seeds will develop.
 

Hanuman

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It could be that the light intensity is too high. I've grown them successfully in a low-light tank, with just a couple of T12 fluorescents. I also think they like slightly cooler temps, and the bulb needs to be placed half in, half out, of the substrate to stop it rotting.
Also, have you read The Secrets of the Madagascar Lace Plant by Ted Coletti. He reckons it's possible that high light could trigger a dormancy period. I guess because it simulates the summer dry season.
Might be the close proximity to the light combined with the higher temperatures. I also don’t have a chiller so I guess not a plant for my setting.

Yes I read that article yesterday while looking for answers. Very intereting. Thank you.

A couple of things, to know about this plant(s) (=there are several varieties/species):
Though being tuberous, they are really, really hungry plants. A capsule of fertilisers at the roots, at surficient intervals(as pr. instructions of ferts) often make a huge difference. Seeing the amount of developing leaves within just a few weeks, when plant starts growing, makes this quite logical.
Despite the rather "fragile" appearance, the leaves are actually quite tough. This plant seem to do best, when watercirculation is relatively high.
Historically these plants have been considered "difficult" to grow. This is likely why we tend to think they need very high light and temperature. They can grow in such conditions, but seem to "over-metabolise", leading to very fast growth and very short life-time of each leaf (exactly the way OP experience). They will actually do better with less light and moderate temperature, though growing slower. Added CO2 works fine - but is not really needed.
As a "fun fact" it will often produce a 2 - 5 divided, purple "pipe-cleaner"-like flower of quite strong and pleasant scent. With some luck, seeds will develop.
Thanks. Clearly my issue is the light combined with temperature. The soil used in that sucker cup is new and I even added some osmocote to make sure it would have plenty of nutrients. Regarding water circulation the plant is actually in front of the outflow so it’s receiving plenty of flow.
 
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Thumper

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If leaves decay you have more organic matter in the tank which the bacterias have to keep up with than if you would just remove the "dead" leaves.
 

Hanuman

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It's not like it's decaying fast like most other plants. With this plant it's actually a slow process.
 

Hanuman

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I don't mind really. I should find a way to move it to some place where there is less light at least to slow down its metabolism.
 
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