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Anubias gracilis problem??

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5 Feb 2012
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Colchester Essex
hi can anybody advise me on whats happening with the leaves on my Anubias gracilis. I only planted a couple of days ago. I shortened the roots as advised by tropica. I use tropica specialised ferts added evry other day. 🤔
820511F9-79AB-4A2D-BCAF-31645C3DBDCD.jpeg
 

alto

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24 Dec 2014
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Anubias gracilis. I only planted a couple of days ago. I shortened the roots as advised by tropica.
Are you certain on this - Anubias sp. are generally recommended to NOT be planted in the substrate as they do much better as epiphytes
While you can trim the roots on Anubias sp, I would do so with some caution

(as noted by others, it does appear that your particular plant has suffered shipping damage, but it is a rather nice A gracilis and should recover as long as the rhizome is undamaged)
 

EA James

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Get it out of the substrate, if the rhizome is buried it will rot and die. It's an epiphyte plant so it needs to be attached onto the hardscape, there are various methods for this. I'd pull that rock out and superglue it on then place it back in. It should be alot happier then :)
 

sparkyweasel

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Tropica and others believe that this species of Anubias will grow happily rooted in substrate. As you are getting a replacement you could try one in the substrate and one attached to hardscape.
 

alto

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this species of Anubias will grow happily rooted in substrate

With this caveat (from Tropica)
If planted in the bottom, the rhizome, from which leaves and roots appear, must not be covered. If it is, the whole plant will rot and die.

Which doesn’t exactly shout it’s substrate affinity to me ;)

Reading Tropica’s description, it sounds like a different cultivar than the one I recall ... the Anubias sp that was most likely to melt soon after shipping, or after placed in various home aquariums, or had its delicate leafs chewed by various tank inhabs
(I was going to say I’d go pick a pot up from my lfs ... but apparently there were transport issues with that shipment and A gracilis remains unavailable)

Just wandering through a few more Anubias sp descriptions, planting in the substrate might apply equally to many cultivars
If planted on the bottom, the rhizome must not be covered because it tends to rot

FWIW I’ve had various Anubias sp. extend roots down into the substrate (when planted reasonably close) so I remain unconvinced :)

ETA from photo in OP it appears as of the rhizome is covered
 

matthewwoodgate

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Get it out of the substrate, if the rhizome is buried it will rot and die. It's an epiphyte plant so it needs to be attached onto the hardscape, there are various methods for this. I'd pull that rock out and superglue it on then place it back in. It should be alot happier then :)
Do you mean literally mean use superglue? I could attach it to something else.
 

EA James

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Do you mean literally mean use superglue? I could attach it to something else.
Yep! As long as it's a Cyanoacrylate glue it's perfectly safe. I have a lot of Epiphyte plants in my tank and they're nearly all attached with superglue, The gel type is better as I find it easier to work with.
You can tie them onto hardscape too using fishing line or cotton thread but I find that method quite fiddly and you can't always get them in exactly the right place. Or just simply wedge them into place
 

matthewwoodgate

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Yep! As long as it's a Cyanoacrylate glue it's perfectly safe. I have a lot of Epiphyte plants in my tank and they're nearly all attached with superglue, The gel type is better as I find it easier to work with.
You can tie them onto hardscape too using fishing line or cotton thread but I find that method quite fiddly and you can't always get them in exactly the right place. Or just simply wedge them into place
What am I trying to achieve with the roots? Even if I can get the plant attached to a rock do the roots need to end up going into the substrate? Or are they happy to just be exposed in the water?
 

X3NiTH

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Happy just to be in water, if a root happens to find some soil it will take full advantage of it.

If you don’t like the white appearance of the superglue when it’s set you can source black superglue instead, the infill material is carbon pigmented latex so the glue remains slightly flexible when set, I’ve not tried it yet it’s on my to do list.

:)
 

matthewwoodgate

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If you don’t want to go down the glue route and avoid thread, fishing line or elastic bait line attachment then Black cable ties are easy to use (and hide) to give the plant time to naturally attach to a surface then remove it when the jobs done.

:)
I think I’ll try the cable tie idea😁
 

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